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Marines will land at Normandy to commemorate D-Day anniversary

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  sparty-on  •  one week ago  •  28 comments

By:   Jeff Schogol (Task Purpose)

Marines will land at Normandy to commemorate D-Day anniversary
About 100 Marines and sailors will conduct an amphibious landing at Normandy, France to honor the 80th anniversary of D-Day.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


About 100 Marines and sailors will conduct an amphibious landing at Normandy, France to honor the 80th anniversary of D-Day.

By Jeff Schogol | Published May 31, 2024 1:22 PM EDT

  • News

Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Marcin Platek.

About 100 U.S. Marines will come ashore at Normandy, France next month as a tribute to the Allied troops who landed there 80 years ago in one of the most decisive battles of World War II.

The United States and other Western Allies landed on the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944 to begin the liberation of Europe from the Nazis. German resistance was especially fierce at Omaha Beach, where U.S. troops suffered 3,600 casualties, including 770 killed. But the Allies were able to establish a toehold on the continent from which they would eventually break out and reach Germany itself.

The landings are among the most revered operations in U.S. military history. In commemoration of their 80th anniversary, U.S. Marines and French troops will land on Omaha next week after the French government extended an invitation for the Marines to help commemorate the invasion. The U.S. Army, whose troops made up the bulk of U.S. forces at Normandy in 1944, is sending paratroopers to France to participate in other ceremonies, including a parachute drop.

The Marines and French troops will conduct the amphibious landings at Omaha and Utah beaches on June 4 and Sword Beach on June 5, said Lt. Col. Antony Andrious, a spokesman for U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Europe and Africa.

On June 6, the French Armed Forces will provide a static display near Omaha Beach that includes an unmanned aerial vehicle, 6 rotary wing aircraft, a landing craft, and a ground platoon of French troops, Andrious said.

The Marines and sailors landing at Normandy will come from the dock landing ship USS Oak Hill, on which the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit is currently embarked, said Capt. Clayton Doss, a spokesman for U.S. Naval Forces Europe - Africa. They will come ashore on Landing Craft, Utility boats.

More than 300 sailors from the cruiser USS Normandy are also participating in ceremonies to mark the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings, Doss told Task & Purpose.

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"U.S. Navy Sailors and Marines are looking forward to commemorating the 80th Anniversary of Operation Overlord (D-Day) alongside their French counterparts next week," Doss said. "The Omaha Beach landing carries forward the D-Day legacy eighty years later and demonstrates that Allied and partner forces can deploy anytime, anywhere to promote peace and security."

US soldiers wade toward shore on Omaha beach on D-Day, 1944. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

The roughly 100 French troops who will take part in the amphibious landings will come from the French amphibious assault ship Mistral, Doss said.

A total of 1,200 U.S. service members from units based in Europe and 15 historic-lineage units based in the continental United States are taking part in the ceremonies, said Terry Welch, a spokesman for U.S. Army Europe and Africa, or USAREUR-AF.

This year's commemorations of the Normandy landings provide an excellent opportunity to showcase some of the U.S. units that are currently deployed to Europe to help defend every inch of NATO territory, said Col. Martin L. O'Donnell, a USAREUR-AF spokesman.

"The bond between the United States and Europe stands as a testament to the enduring strength of our Alliance," Gen. Darryl A. Williams, commander of USAREUR-AF, said in a statement. "Eighty years since D-Day, our collective resolve remains unwavering, fortified by decades of steadfast defense. As we continue to march forward, transforming along the way, while at the same time enhancing our deterrence and defensive posture, let us stand united and firm in opposition to any threat that dares to jeopardize the hard-won peace and security here on the continent and beyond."

Along with the beach landings, U.S. soldiers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions will pay tribute to the role paratroopers played on D-Day. As the massive invasion fleet crossed the English Channel in 1944, thousands of U.S. troops were dropped by parachute and gliders into France ahead of the landings to help pave the way for the massive amphibious assault.

"It was June 6, 1944, when our division came onto the world stage parachuting into Normandy clearing the way for the invasion of Western Europe and marking the beginning of the Allies assault on Nazi Germany," said Lt. Col. Tony Hoefler, spokesman for the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). "Now, 80 years later, the 101st has transformed into an air assault division and still helping to secure the peace in Europe.

On June 2, soldiers from the 3rd Brigade Combat Team — known as the Rakkasans — , 101st Airborne Division will conduct an air assault demonstration in Carentan, France, Hoefler told Task & Purpose. The unit is currently deployed to Eastern Europe.

"The air assault demonstration is meant to highlight the division's ability to deliver one brigade combat team up to 500 nautical miles in one period of darkness at the place and time of the combatant commander's choosing," Hoefler said. "The demonstration will be viewed by spectators throughout the world who have converged on Normandy, France to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the invasion of Europe on D-Day."

As part of this year's closing ceremonies, about 130 soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division will take part in a parachute drop to honor the Allied paratroopers who jumped into France ahead of the landings, said Lt. Col. Cesar Santiago, a spokesman for the division.

"By June of 1944, France had been under Nazi occupation for four years," Santiago told Task & Purpose. "Eighty years later, we commemorate the 23,000 Allied Paratroopers who pierced the Atlantic Wall on D-Day to assist the Allied assault forces on the Normandy beachheads. Our Paratrooping ancestors of the 82d Airborne Division set a remarkable standard of courage and conviction for our Paratroopers today."

Jeff Schogol is a senior staff writer for Task & Purpose. He has covered the military for 15 years, with previous bylines at the Express-Times in Easton, Pennsylvania, Stars & Stripes, and Military Times.


Article is LOCKED by author/seeder
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Sparty On
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Sparty On    one week ago

Oorah!!

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
Professor Quiet
1.1  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Sparty On @1    one week ago

Semper Fi!

 
 
 
Jeremy Retired in NC
Professor Expert
2  Jeremy Retired in NC    one week ago

I have some friends from the 82d Airborne who are reenacting the Airborne part of Operation Overlord.  I think there are some veterans who made that jump that will be taking part.

I did the jump in 2014 and glad I did.  We jumped the same drop zones they landed on 80 years ago with the same aircraft.  Only change was the parachutes we jumped.  

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
2.1  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Jeremy Retired in NC @2    one week ago

Outstanding!

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
3  Hallux    one week ago

There will be a Canadian contingent at Juno Beach.

 

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Hallux @3    one week ago

Represent

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
3.1.1  Hallux  replied to  Sparty On @3.1    one week ago

?

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1.2  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Hallux @3.1.1    one week ago

What’s the question?

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
3.1.3  Freefaller  replied to  Hallux @3.1.1    one week ago

"represent" is (perhaps 'was' is more accurate) a trendy slang term in the US, particularly from rap music meaning "show your pride"

Basically it's a good thing

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1.4  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Freefaller @3.1.3    one week ago

Yes it is but then again he knows that.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1.5  Kavika   replied to  Sparty On @3.1.4    one week ago

I hope you don't mind but I'm going to add this for our Canadian Friends. 

Sargent Tommy Prince a highly decorated veteran of WWI and Korea.

A member of the super-elite ''Devils Brigade'' in WWII. The Indigenous (Anishinaabe) Warrior.

Tommy_Prince_%28Cropped%29.jpeg

Thomas George Prince ,   MM   (October 25, 1915 – November 25, 1977) was an Indigenous Canadian war hero and the most decorated soldier in the   First Special Service Force   or   Devil's Brigade , an elite American-Canadian commando unit, during World War II. He was Canada's most decorated   First Nations   soldier, serving in   World War II   and the   Korean War . Prince was one of only three Canadians to receive both the Canadian   Military Medal   and the American   Silver Star   during WWII. Prince's military deeds as a scout and as a forward combatant were unique and of major strategic importance.

Tommy Prince was descended from First Nations chiefs. Prince's grandfather had negotiated treaty rights in Manitoba with representatives of   The Crown . Prince himself would also represent First Nations concerns in Ottawa as Chairman of both the Manitoba Indian Association (currently   Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs ) and the First Nations of Canada national delegation. He advocated for the abolition of the governing   Indian Act   in Canada and proposed respect for the traditional Crown treaties as the basis of First Nations rights. Prince's position, although considered radical at the time, has been vindicated in subsequent decades by   Supreme Court of Canada   rulings in support of the Crown treaties and is now the basis of government policy.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1.6  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Kavika @3.1.5    one week ago

Nope, love the addition.    Thx!

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
3.1.7  Freefaller  replied to  Sparty On @3.1.4    one week ago
he knows that.

Maybe I suppose but from reading his post I don't think so

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4  Kavika     one week ago

The actors from ''Band of Brothers'' will be jumping in honor of the men they played.

My cousin Monroe jumped with the 101st and fought all the way to Bastogne where he was KIA 24/12/44 when the ''Battling Bastards of Bastogne'' stopped the German counter-attack when in the immortal words of General McAuliffe told the German commander when they told them to surrender, ''NUTS''.

My aunt and uncle planted a weeping birch tree on our home reservation of Red Lake MN in the spring of 1945 to honor their son and three others of our family that were KIA in WWII. The tree still stands today with a plaque that has names and units. 

My dad would be proud that the Marines will take part in the re enactment of the Normandy landing. He was a member of the Second Marines that hit the beach at Tarawa (Betio), Saipan, and Okinawa and a few other forgotten islands in the Pacific.

Semper Fi

Airborne all the Way.

Waanakiwin (peace)

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
4.1  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Kavika @4    one week ago

Thx for sharing Kav.   He might have fought with some of my Family and friends.    Guadalcanal, Pelelui, Iwo …..

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Sparty On @4.1    one week ago

And a salute to your family and friends, Sparty...Hero's all.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
4.1.2  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Kavika @4.1.1    one week ago

Yep and your son, I haven’t forgotten…..

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.3  Kavika   replied to  Sparty On @4.1.2    one week ago

Thank you for that, very much appreciated, Sparty.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
4.1.4  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Kavika @4.1.3    one week ago

He’s a Marine, my brother of a different mother.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
Professor Quiet
4.2  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Kavika @4    one week ago

My father was in the Army as a armorer/gunner on quad .50 cal mounted on the back of M3 halftracks and came ashore at Omaha Beach on 11 June 1944 with the 30th Infantry Division (Old Hickory) and fought in the liberation of Holland, the Battle of The Bulge, the Rhineland Battles, and helped liberate a sub camp of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp. What little he told me of his experiences before he passed is that bothered him the most.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.2.1  Kavika   replied to  Ed-NavDoc @4.2    one week ago

A salute to your father, Doc, the Greatest Generation.

 
 
 
Jeremy Retired in NC
Professor Expert
5  Jeremy Retired in NC    one week ago

Veterans, civilians parachute over Normandy for D-Day 80th anniversary

The skies above Normandy were once again filled with Western soldiers jumping out of planes. 80 years after the Allied forces launched the massive D-Day invasion, veterans and civilians leapt out of C-47s, this time in celebration and not in the face of enemy fire. The Sunday, June 2 jump saw dozens of people, military veterans and civilians, jumping into the skies over the town of Carentan-les-Marais. The journey was meant to mimic the one Allied soldiers made eight decades ago. D-Day proper was on June 6, 1944, but Sunday’s jump was meant to be the opening event of a week of commemorations and remembrance of the Allied invasion.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
6  seeder  Sparty On    one week ago

To all, feel free to post any family/friends involved on that day.    All should be honored and I’m all about that

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
7  Drinker of the Wry    one week ago

One of my greatest honors during my active Army service was supporting the D-Day ceremonies at Normandy.  Several years before the 50th anniversary, the Army conducted a rehearsal by staging a number of ceremonies.  They ranged from one in London, VIPs boarding the USS Eisenhower and crossing the channel.  On the French side there were ceremonies at the Cemetery, Pointe du hoc, site of Eisenhower first field HQ in France, Sainte-Mère-Église, Caen and Paris.  VIPs included the SecArmy, SecNavy, John Eisenhower and others.  I arranged for an Army historian to give our support troops tours of the battle.

It was a very moving event.  My favorite experiences was talking with Vets and French locals and hearing their memories.  The cemetery and this part of Normandy is very beautiful and I encourage anyone planning on visiting southern England or northern France to make time for Normandy.  The Calvados is pretty damn good as well.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
7.1  seeder  Sparty On  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @7    one week ago

Awesome Wry, thx for sharing.    Walking the beaches and land these guys fought is moving as hell.    I got to do that on Peleliu where my dads brother fought.

Walked the beach he landed on and roughly followed the path they fought through the island.     It was very emotional to say the least.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
7.1.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Sparty On @7.1    one week ago

Indeed, in the Army we call them terrain walks or staff rides.  I’ve been able to experience a number including Waterloo, Civil War, WWI, WWII and Korea.  Two weeks ago, our office did the 2nd Battle of Bull Run.  

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8  Kavika     one week ago

This may be an interesting story to some. The monument of the Turtle is what we call north America, Turtle Island and the turtle is highly respected by all NAs and is the perfect monument of Normany. Mr. Shay is taking part in this years 80th Anniversary he is 99 years young. He was a combat medic with the Big Red One, the First Infantry Division.

King Congratulates Charles Shay of Indian Island on Dedication of Shay Indian Memorial in Normandy, France on 73rd Anniversary of D-Day

Omaha%20Beach%20CharlesShayIndianMemorial%20plaque+Turtle%2030%20May%202017%20(2).jpg

WASHINGTON, D.C.   – Following the dedication of the Charles Shay Indian Memorial in Normandy, France today, U.S. Senator Angus King (I-Maine) released the text of a letter he sent to the memorial’s namesake, Mr. Charles Shay, of Indian Island, Maine.

“This park, overlooking Omaha Beach, is a tribute to all Native American soldiers who bravely advanced in the defense of the free world, despite grave peril and under tremendous enemy fire. The United States, and the world at large, are eternally indebted to this bravery, which established a strategic foothold in France and lead to Allied victory on the Western Front,”   Senator King wrote in his letter . “While no words can truly thank you for the courage you showed as a medic on that beach, please know that this park will act as a timeless reminder to generations to come that democracy triumphed over tyranny—that good triumphed over evil—because soldiers, like you and your Native American comrades, selflessly served and sacrificed in the face of great odds in the D-Day invasion.”

In Normandy today, on the 73 rd   anniversary of D-Day, a memorial overlooking Omaha Beach was named after Mr. Shay, who, as a then-19-year old medic, was in the first wave of the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944 where he saved several of his wounded comrades. Mr. Shay, now 93, was later awarded a Silver Star for his actions. A plaque at the memorial reads in part:

            “In honor of Charles Norman Shay and in grateful memory of the 500 American and Canadian Indian soldiers who participated in Operation Neptune for the liberation of Normandy on D-Day, June 6 th , 1944. About 175 American Indians invaded Omaha Beach. Some were medics, others fought as seamen, scouts, snipers, radio operators, machine gunners, artillery gunmen, combat engineers or forward observers. A member of the Penobscot Indian Nation, 19-year old Private Shay was a combat medic from Indian Island, Maine. Soon after dawn, he came ashore near here as a member of an assault platoon. Repeatedly plunging into the treacherous sea, he carrier critically wounded comrades to safety under heavy fire. For his unselfish heroism on this beach, he was awarded the Silver Star and he continued to save the wounded until the war ended.”

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
9  Vic Eldred    one week ago

This story is related:

E ighty years after the  D-Day invasions , many soldiers have still not been identified. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency has accounted for at least seven soldiers through DNA matching. Three of those positive identifications have come in the past year.

"Part of the challenge is differentiating the remains, because, the chaos after the war," said Kelly McKeague, the agency’s director. "Obviously, the ones they could identify have been back home since the 1940s. The ones that are  still missing  are the ones we're looking for."

Nearly 73,000 U.S. troops landed in Normandy on June 6, 1944. More than 2,500 were killed or were missing in action. McKeague says hundreds are still yet to be identified.

"The case of those three soldiers, they were part of a landing craft on June 6 and hit a mine," said McKeague.

Army Cpl. Julius Wolfe, Army Sgt. John Herrick and Army Tech4 Elmo Hartwick were all part of the 149th Engineer Battalion. On D-Day, they boarded the same landing craft and headed for Omaha Beach.

BB1nESQ0.img?w=768&h=432&m=6&x=814&y=304&s=154&d=154
Army Cpl. Julius Wolfe, Tech4 Elmo Hartwick and Sgt. John Herrick, each part of the 149th Engineer Battalion, were killed aboard the ill-fated vessel as it struck an underwater mine before it was able to beach at Normandy. Fox News ©   DPAA / Battlefield Museum

The soldiers would never make it to battle. The vessel struck a mine as it was hit by artillery fire. The craft exploded, killing around 200 onboard.

The three soldiers were buried as unknowns in four different graves at Normandy American Cemetery. The graves were exhumed in 2021, so scientists could analyze the DNA.

"DNA technology has advanced in incredible ways," McKeague said. "With World War II, Congress didn't give it to the  Department of Defense  until 2010. And so we're playing catch up in developing the historical references, the research with which to be able to pursue certain cases."

Two years after the remains were exhumed, officials were able to positively identify the three men killed onboard the landing craft.

Herrick will be buried on Veterans Day of this year in  Emporia, Kansas . The date would have been his 100th birthday. Wolfe was buried in his hometown of Liberal, Missouri in April. A memorial service for Hartwick will be held in Onaga, Kansas at a later date.

Three men who died during D-Day invasion identified in last year (msn.com

 
 

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