╌>

Trump and the RNC abandoned the Republican platform and the legacy of Ronald Reagan

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  jbb  •  one week ago  •  17 comments

By:   NBC News

Trump and the RNC abandoned the Republican platform and the legacy of Ronald Reagan
The 2020 Republican National Convention's feting of Donald Trump has no platform because the Republican Party no longer has principles.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Aug. 27, 2020, 8:35 AM By Sean O'Keefe

Time was, you could highlight Republican principles on a flash card, particularly when it came to national security. At the 1980 Republican National Convention— when Republican clarity about the party's ideals was at a peak — Americans knew where we stood, and the Reagan-Bush administrations followed through with policies that gave life to those principles.

I am supporting Biden because he, more than Trump, embodies American — and even Republican — national security principles now.

The premise, as laid out in the party platform, started with the proposition that international order created peace and prosperity for Americans. That "peace through strength" meant a formidable military presence around the globe, an asset to us and a deterrent to our enemies. That fair trade was a motivation to overcome differences. That democracy and human rights were legitimate objectives worth persuading others around the globe to embrace. And that to achieve these results, we would stand by our allies and together we could restrain those nations, like Russia, that wished to harm us.

These were simple, bedrock principles — ones for which there wasn't much daylight between Republicans and Democrats — and they guided us well through the American century. Tragically, it appears these Republican principles have been lost. Nothing makes that clearer than the lack of a 2020 Republican platform to frame the ideas Republicans stand behind. Rather, the party has instituted a blind endorsement of President Donald Trump and his "America First" priorities, whatever those may be.

This absence of principles, above all else, is what drove me and more than 70 other national security leaders from previous Republican administrations to conclude that former Vice President Joe Biden would be better to lead and preserve our national security than a president who claims to be a Republican, but one that Ronald Reagan wouldn't recognize.

As the secretary of the Navy in the George H.W. Bush administration, it pains me to admit this. Not just because I believe that the GOP truly stood for something great and that previous Republican presidents acted on principles, but also because the absence of any principles puts our nation and the world in tremendous danger.

Finding examples is as simple as pointing at the map. Take Europe, a continent full of American allies that forms the bulwark of peace and prosperity in the West. Trump's stance has been to threaten to pull out of NATO, an alliance we painstakingly constructed over the last seven decades to secure our nation's defense at our allies' shoreline, whose members have stood with us as we brought down the Soviet Union, liberated Kuwait and fought the war against terrorism together following 9/11.

At times, Trump has taken damaging action in line with this posture, such as his confounding decision in a fit of pique in July to pull nearly 12,000 troops out of Germany — and, in the process, to weaken our deterrent against Russia, make it more difficult for our troops to move quickly to global hot spots and complicate care for our wounded service members at the Landstuhl hospital in Germany.

We have alienated our allies and been suckered by our enemies further afield, as well. We abruptly canceled joint military exercises with South Korea, a vital economic partner that presidents of both parties have relied on to check North Korean aggression. Instead, Trump "fell in love" with North Korean despot Kim Jong Un and allowed him to move ever closer to building nuclear weapons that are increasingly capable of reaching our nation.

Thankfully, no South Koreans have (yet) lost their lives as a result of our betrayal, but the same cannot be said for the Kurds in the Middle East. We removed U.S. forces that were keeping the Turkish military from moving against our Kurdish allies — allies who helped us defeat the Islamic State militant group — allowing Turkey to displace 100,000 Kurds and kill many more. In turn, the region is even more chaotic and now another incubator for yet more terrorist activities.

Yet the president blithely uses U.S. military forces as a threat here at home — against our own people — to quell civil unrest. This was among the motivations that drove early American revolutionaries to rebel against the monarchy that repressed them. And it is an instinct that U.S. military service members recoil against because they swore to defend the United States, not to be used as a blunt instrument against their own people.

My concern about the abandonment of Republican principles in the Trump era is not about wistful nostalgia for an earlier time, however, or even a vague desire to "do the right thing." Today, all of America's security challenges are international and require an international response. The COVID-19 pandemic proved, once again, that viruses do not respect international barriers and that "fortress America" is not a fortress at all. What happens in a market in Wuhan affects us here, as the nearly 180,000 people COVID-19 has killed in the United States can only attest to from the grave.

In addition to working together to stop a deadly disease, we need our allies to join us to combat terrorism, ameliorate or adapt to climate change and stem mass migration. But it seems there's no ally we won't alienate. Trump has started diplomatic spats with Canada, Australia, Germany, France and, somehow, even Denmark and Sweden. These incidents have consequences for American national security leaders who have forged working relationships over three generations and report that our allies no longer trust us.

It seems there's no ally we won't alienate. Trump has started diplomatic spats with Canada, Australia, Germany, France and, somehow, even Denmark and Sweden.

I am supporting Biden because he, more than Trump, embodies American — and even Republican — national security principles now. As President George H.W. Bush said, "America is never wholly herself unless she is engaged in high moral principle." As President Dwight Eisenhower said, "A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both." As President George W. Bush said, "We can only see the reality of America's need by seeing it through the eyes of the threatened, oppressed and disenfranchised."

These are all beliefs espoused by Republican presidents who have lived and acted on them. It was only under Trump that the Republican Party started behaving as though principles didn't matter.

I have not always agreed with Biden, and it's unlikely I will always agree with him if he is elected president. But when disagreements do occur, I will have returned to the ranks of the loyal opposition and will be able to express my objections and prescriptions by appealing to the deeply held principles that have guided him throughout his career in public service. Those differences will likely be due to conflicting views over policy, and at least the Democrats put out a party platform of policies to debate.

Related:

  • Melania Trump tried to make a woman's case for her husband. Here's why it failed.
  • AOC's DNC speech was 60 seconds. What she said — and couldn't say — spoke volumes.
  • Trump's White House just openly breaks ethics laws now. But there's a solution.

Sean O'Keefe

Sean O'Keefe was the secretary of the Navy in the George H.W. Bush administration and the NASA administrator in the George W. Bush administration. He is the former chancellor of Louisiana State University and is now a professor of public administration at the Syracuse University Maxwell School.


Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
[]
 
JBB
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JBB    one week ago

The gop has not passed a party platform since 2016 and the MAGA mob will not again this year. They do not want us to know...

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
1.1  Gsquared  replied to  JBB @1    one week ago

The gop platform is total obedience to Trump's every whim.  

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
1.1.1  evilone  replied to  Gsquared @1.1    one week ago

The GoP platform is right here ->

Trump is only the useful idiot needed to rally support.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
1.1.2  Snuffy  replied to  evilone @1.1.1    one week ago

Except isn't Project 2025 from the Heritage Foundation and not the Republican Party? For this to be the actual GOP platform, the executive committee would need to vote that as the party platform.

Project 2025 | The Heritage Foundation

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
1.1.3  Gsquared  replied to  evilone @1.1.1    one week ago

Both very good points.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
1.1.4  evilone  replied to  Snuffy @1.1.2    one week ago
Except isn't Project 2025 from the Heritage Foundation and not the Republican Party?

Follow the money and you'll see for yourself they are pretty much one and the same these days. 

I don't like this uber liberal source, but the information is still true...

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
1.1.5  Snuffy  replied to  evilone @1.1.4    one week ago

Ignoring the obvious partisan beats in the article, that doesn't really show that it's the same as the GOP. It's hard right lobbyists who want to see their agenda pushed hard should Trump win in November. Your link doesn't show any direct ties of money from the Heritage Foundation to the GOP. I have no doubt they do donate directly to the GOP, much like the Soro's Group donates to the DNC. 

There are all sorts of partisan lobbyist groups that work with the two major political parties to "get their wish list in and considered" but it still doesn't provide any direct link to a party platform.

But imagine how life might be in this country if political parties were outlawed and politics actually worked for the people. Yeah, yeah, I know. Pipe dream. But it's still morning here and I always say if you're gonna dream then dream big!!

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
1.1.6  CB  replied to  evilone @1.1.4    one week ago

You are spot on. Donald will be beholden to the 2025 Project think-tanks. (They, are hoping for a conservative majority in the house and senate to buoy up Donald.)  It's the blueprint. They will 'milk' Donald even as Donald 'milks' them back!

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.7  Trout Giggles  replied to  Snuffy @1.1.5    one week ago
But imagine how life might be in this country if political parties were outlawed and politics actually worked for the people. Yeah, yeah, I know. Pipe dream. But it's still morning here and I always say if you're gonna dream then dream big!!

This is why I like you, Snuffy. I like a good pipe dream when I;m drinking my coffee. LOL

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
1.1.8  evilone  replied to  Snuffy @1.1.5    one week ago
Your link doesn't show any direct ties of money from the Heritage Foundation to the GOP.

The whole article was about one of Trump's non-profits, American Compass, accidentally reveling it's top donors and American Compass itself donating big money to Project 2025.  There are also the direct ties from Trump to The Heritage Foundation between Miller, Banon, Vought and Meadows. 

Since Trump has installed his people at the top of the RNC now, anything Trump is now everything GoP. 

But imagine how life might be in this country if political parties were outlawed and politics actually worked for the people. Yeah, yeah, I know. Pipe dream. But it's still morning here and I always say if you're gonna dream then dream big!!

Someday the US will see their error and once again revoke Corporate Personhood and dark money from politics. Both sides play that game. Companies aren't people and people shouldn't be allowed to donate to campaigns they can't vote for.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
1.1.9  CB  replied to  evilone @1.1.4    one week ago

Outrage at GOP Plan for Execution Spree If Donald Trump Wins

Story by Khaleda Rahman
5/15/2024
 
A conservative plan to execute every person on federal death row if former President  Donald Trump returns to the White House has sparked alarm and outrage.

Thirteen prisoners  were put to death in the final months of the first Trump administration in an unprecedented run of federal executions. 

Pre
sident Joe Biden has not kept a promise to abolish the federal death penalty, although his Justice Department announced a moratorium on federal executions in 2021—a pause that could end if Trump wins in November.

Much of the planning for a possible second Trump term has been unofficially outsourced to Project 2025 , a coalition of conservative organizations, The Washington Post reported in November.

In April 2023, Project 2025 released a 900-page report called "Mandate for Leadership: The Conservative Promise," which lays out policy proposals to thoroughly reshape the federal government in the event of a GOP win in the 2024 presidential election.

More than 500 pages into the report , Gene Hamilton, a former Trump administration official, wrote in a chapter on the Department of Justice that the next conservative administration should "do everything possible to obtain finality for the 44 prisoners currently on federal death row."

Death penalty opponents say the report indicates that a second Trump administration would not hesitate to carry out federal executions in quick succession—and that it should serve as "a wake-up call" for the Biden administration to commute the sentences of people on federal death row.

In the report, Hamilton wrote about not only resuming the death penalty but expanding it, saying the next conservative administration "should also pursue the death penalty for applicable crimes—particularly heinous crimes involving violence and sexual abuse of children—until  Congress  says otherwise through legislation."

Hamilton added in a footnote that pursing the death penalty for those convicted of sexually abusing children "could require seeking the  Supreme Court to overrule Kennedy v. Louisiana —a 2008 case in which justices outlawed the executions of those convicted of raping a child—but that the department "should place a priority on doing so."

Newsweek has contacted the White House, the Biden campaign and the Trump campaign for comment via email.

Abraham Bonowitz, the executive director of Death Penalty Action, told Newsweek that Trump's "personal fetish for power is on steroids when it comes to executions."

The plan "to massively increase executions should he be elected should be deeply concerning to everyone," Bonowitz continued, adding that Trump "has said he wants to execute U.S. military leaders and other U.S. government officials who opposed his off-the-rails and treasonous agendas. Someone needs to remind him he is running for president of the United States of America, not North Korea."

The Reverend Jeff Hood, who has been a spiritual adviser to dozens of people on death row, told Newsweek that "the promises of mass execution are disturbing but not surprising."

He added, "We must do everything we can to keep such horrors from happening."

Austin Sarat, a political scientist who has written extensively about botched executions and the death penalty, said the Project 2025 plan served as "yet another wake-up call for progressives as to why they cannot afford to sit on their hands during the 2024 presidential campaign, and to the Biden administration as to why they should stop temporizing about capital punishment."

"Project 2025's 'Mandate for Leadership' offers a way for Trump to turn his fantasies and fervor about the death penalty into a chilling plan of action," Sarat wrote in a Slate op-ed published Tuesday.

He added: "That is why, at the very least, Joe Biden should use his clemency power to commute the sentence of everyone now on the federal death row. It is why progressives, who now may harbor doubts about Biden, must enlist as loyal foot soldiers in his reelection campaign."

Death penalty opponents have long called for Biden to take action on ending the federal death penalty, concerned that a future president could easily lift the moratorium.

"After the horrific killing spree we saw under the Trump administration, the importance of this promise could not be more clear," Cassandra Stubbs, the director of the ACLU Capital Punishment Project, previously told Newsweek.

The Trump administration spent millions carrying out federal executions in the final months of his presidency. Those executions were shrouded in secrecy, the Associated Press reported, with officials cutting corners and relying on the Supreme Court's conservative majority to clear legal obstacles to completing the executions.

Outrage at GOP Plan for Execution Spree If Donald Trump Wins (msn.com)


There is the 2025 imprimatur and name as a foundational source for Trump's 2025 plans . Not hard to make the proper connections from think-tank to a future Trump administration 2024 and beyond.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
1.1.10  Snuffy  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.7    one week ago
I like a good pipe dream when I;m drinking my coffee.

So long as it's not so good that you laugh and spit your coffee. I'm not responsible for cleaning computer monitors.  

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
1.2  Snuffy  replied to  JBB @1    one week ago

A couple of points that you seem to ignore here.

Party platforms are released at the national conventions and neither party has yet had their conventions. Even the Democrat party has not released a party platform for 2024.

The Republican Party voted to adopt the same 2016 platform for the 2020 election, so they did have a party platform.

Platform - Ballotpedia

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.2.1  Tessylo  replied to  Snuffy @1.2    one week ago

They have no platform, JBB is correct

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
1.2.2  Snuffy  replied to  Tessylo @1.2.1    one week ago

Prove it. I provided evidence, why don't you. 

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
1.2.3  GregTx  replied to  Snuffy @1.2.2    one week ago

You know why.

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Expert
2  Nerm_L    one week ago

Yes, the RNC has abandoned the legacy of Ronald Reagan.   About friggin' time, too.  Now it's up to Democrats to keep Reagan's legacy alive.  Maybe Clinton should run again.

 
 

Who is online




47 visitors