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The UAW is racing to unionize the South - VW is the first to fall.

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  kavika  •  4 weeks ago  •  73 comments

By:   Whizy Kim (Vox)

The UAW is racing to unionize the South - VW is the first to fall.
An expert explains why a unionized Volkswagen plant in Tennessee could mean big things nationwide.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


The UAW is unlocking worker power in the South. An expert explains why it matters.

By Whizy Kim@whizyk Apr 24, 2024, 8:00am EDT GettyImages_2147937551.0.jpg On April 18, the United Auto Workers won the union vote at a Volkswagen assembly plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Whizy Kim is a reporter covering how the world's wealthiest people wield influence, including the policies and cultural norms they help forge. Before joining Vox, she was a senior writer at Refinery29.

The Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, has about 5,500 employees. On April 19, almost three-quarters of them voted to join the United Auto Workers.

It's the latest victory for one of the country's largest labor unions, coming on the heels of a major contract win last fall with the "Big Three" American carmakers: GM, Ford, and Stellantis (which merged with Chrysler), whose workers make up about 150,000 of the UAW's 400,000-plus membership.

A union vote at Volkswagen's Chattanooga assembly plant is big news for many reasons. For one, the US was the last country where Volkswagen workers didn't have some form of representation. But perhaps more importantly, it's failed twice before, once in 2014 and again in 2019; Volkswagen Chattanooga will be the first non-Big Three auto plant in the South to become unionized.

The UAW has no intention of slowing down now. Union president Shawn Fain told the Guardian that the Volkswagen plant was "the first domino to fall" in a strategy targeting mainly foreign automakers in the South: In May, there's a UAW vote at a Mercedes plant in Alabama, and organizing efforts are also beginning at BMW, Toyota, Honda, Hyundai, and Nissan plants, among others, across several Southern states. (The union has also set its sights on Tesla facilities in Texas, Nevada, and California.)

The UAW has eyes on the South because it stands to gain huge ground there. In the last few decades, a slew of auto plants have popped up in the region, a trend that's only accelerating as more car companies invest in making EVs and announce new manufacturing facilities in the US. States often offer tempting subsidies to attract automakers to set up shop within their borders, but companies have an extra incentive to head South: it has some of the lowest unionization rates in the nation. In South Carolina, just 2.3 percent of workers belong to a union, compared to 24.1 percent in Hawaii and 20.6 percent in New York.

This stark regional difference is tied to a history of racist anti-labor laws, an outgrowth of Jim Crow laws that segregated Black and white Americans in the South until they were overturned by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Vox spoke to Andrew Wolf, a professor of global labor and work at Cornell University, on how unionizing the South could not only raise wages for all auto workers, but also tear down some of the racial disparities workers of color experience in the economy.

The following conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

Why was the union vote at Volkswagen's Chattanooga plant such a big deal?

This was a big deal for many reasons. There has not been an organizing victory of this size in the South in decades. It's a place where the union had lost previously. It just has really big ramifications for the future of organized labor, and the future of the economy in the South.

This is the first Volkswagen union in the US, but Volkswagen already has unionized workers in other countries. Did that make organizing easier or harder here?

The existence of unions and the really strong labor laws that exist in Germany generally certainly helped. It helped compel the company to be far more neutral and less aggressive in opposing the union than, for example, what's happening right now at Mercedes in Alabama.

Yes, workers at the Alabama plant are claiming Mercedes is retaliating against their union efforts . As you noted, the Chattanooga vote is a huge deal because it's in the South. I think I know the answer to this, but — are there many unionized auto plants in the South?

No. These companies opened in the South to avoid unions, especially with the rise of neoliberalism after the general financial crisis in the 1970s. It's a within-country version of outsourcing. More and more companies move to the South to avoid unions, to take advantage of the lower wages that are the historical legacy of Jim Crow. You see it explicitly in the comments of the governors — you had the governors of all of these states talking about how this unionization would undermine the culture and values of the South. That's very coded language for, "We don't let workers get representation or fair pay in the South, because it's better for business."

In the past few years we've seen some high-profile wins for American unions , but the reality is that union membership rates in the US are pretty low. In the 1950s, about a third of workers were in a union. What happened in those intervening years?

Many things happened — globalization, neoliberalism, change in laws. The biggest thing was just that there were declines in the industries where unions were strongest, and a lack of union organizing in the industries that were fast-growing. So that combined with increased employer hostility, increased political hostility, and weakening of labor and employment laws, drove down the rate of unionization in this country.

In the South, specifically, what were the policies that led to such low unionization?

As with everything in America, the answer to the question is race. Avoiding unions was part of the Jim Crow apparatus. Unions are particularly threatening to orders like Jim Crow, because they bring workers across races together in common cause. So unionization was a real threat to the economic order of the South and that has had lasting impact, with wages being significantly lower in the South, unionization rates lower in the South, and poverty rates being higher.

The National Labor Relations Act passed in the '30s, and then after World War II, Congresspasses the Taft-Hartley Act, which undermined the NLRA. But specifically, [Taft-Hartley] empowers states to undermine [the NLRA]. All the Southern states passed these right-to-work laws while the more heavily unionized states in the North and Midwest didn't institute right-to-work. Essentially, it's a strategy that makes it both harder to organize and keep the unions funded if you do organize.

And what are right-to-work laws?

Right-to-work laws are laws that allow workers in unionized workplaces to refuse to pay fair-share fees. Where unions exist, workers can either become a member, in which case they pay dues, or if they don't want to become a member they have to pay their fair-share fees, which covers the cost of the union representing them. This makes it much harder for unions to fund themselves. Then there's other little things that exist in right-to-work laws in different states, such as requiring the union to get everyone to re-sign up for the union every single year in order to pay dues.

Do workers who aren't members of a union still benefit from them?

[Yes.] For example, if you're a worker in a shop that's unionized in a right-to-work state, and you decide you don't want to pay dues, but then you get fired and you want to challenge that termination — the union is still legally required to represent you, even though you have not paid for that representation.

How does low unionization tie into the high rates of poverty we see in the South today?

There's two mechanisms. There's a significant and persistent union premium, with unionized workers making more money. Additionally, there's the spillover effects of this. If you have a high unionization rate in your locality, the other employers pay better as well, to remain competitive — a kind of "rising tides lifts all boats" situation. Without unionization, in the South, it depresses wages across the board, and then in turn it depresses wages across the country because there's always this threat that auto companies could leave Detroit and go south.

Also, many Southern states haven't set their own minimum wage separate from the federal minimum [which is still $7.25 per hour].

Yes, exactly. And right now there's this huge push across the South to roll back the few labor rights they do have — most prominently, removing all these child labor laws. They just rolled back health and safety laws, including heat laws in Florida for agricultural workers.

To get back to Volkswagen in Chattanooga — the union vote passed with 73 percent saying yes. Is that high? Just okay?

I was shocked. I mean, it's a completely overwhelming victory, especially when you consider that the union had lost here in the past. It just really shows you how powerful this moment is right now, and how much workers are buying the message that the current UAW is selling.

The Chattanooga facility voted no to unionization twice before. What do you think was different this time?

Everything's different. The biggest difference was this massive contract victory that UAW had at the Big Three last fall. When workers see unions win, it increases interest in the unions — so it had a real galvanizing effect. There was so much publicity on it, talking about these big wage increases. I think these workers down in the South were looking at their paychecks and comparing, right, and realizing the raw deal they have. Additionally, you had the experience of the pandemic, where all these workers were told they were essential, but then they weren't compensated as if they were essential. It's just spurred this massive upsurge in labor organizing since the pandemic.

What did you think when you heard that the UAW was going to try to unionize the South?

It just struck me as really smart, to leverage this big contract victory to go out and try to improve conditions more generally in the industry. Because, as I said, a rising tide lifts all boats, but also, the sinking tides in the South can diminish the wages for unionized workers in the North. I think [UAW organizers] also realize there's this imperative, that you can't let this big disparity in auto wages exist between the North and South and continue to win these meaningful contracts.

What does this portend for the upcoming Mercedes UAW vote? It's a different state, a different company. Are there different headwinds?

It will be more challenging there, because the company is being far more aggressively anti-union. We talked about how the relationship with the VW union in Germany helped in this situation. But, at the same time, I think there are reasons to be hopeful that the UAW might succeed given what we've seen elsewhere. I feel much better about it considering that the Chattanooga vote was 73 percent than if it had been, say, 51 percent.

Right now, many foreign carmakers are trying to establish a bigger presence here as the US transitions to electric vehicles . Does that make it more pivotal that the UAW expansion happen right now?

Yeah, and you saw this reflected in the contract the UAW secured with the Big Three as well. The move to electric vehicles is going to really change the auto industry — it's probably going to result in less putting-the-car-together jobs, so to speak, but probably more parts jobs. So the UAW contracts last fall secured the right to organize some of these battery factories. It's absolutely coming at the right time, because it's a moment [that] would have only further undermined the UAW foothold in the industry.

Do you see this as potentially inspiring for other companies and industries in the South?

For sure. I would imagine that is what we would see. It's hard, though — I don't know if interest in movements for it will necessarily result in victory. But I think you'll see much more labor action in the South and elsewhere across the country.



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OFF-TOPIC COMMENTS WILL BE DELETED WITHOUT WARNING.


 

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Kavika
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Kavika     4 weeks ago

An amazing number of employees voted for the union (73%) and this may mark a huge change in the auto industry in especially in the south.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Kavika @1    4 weeks ago

They are tired of being taken advantage of. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  JohnRussell @1.1    4 weeks ago
They are tired of being taken advantage of. 

That certainly is part of the vote, a big part.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @1    4 weeks ago

uh oh, that workforce looks... diverse. all making about $80K a year. that probably won't go over too well in dixie...

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
1.2.1  GregTx  replied to  devangelical @1.2    4 weeks ago

Why not?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.2.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  devangelical @1.2    4 weeks ago

One thing for sure it will change the dynamics in those states.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.2.3  Texan1211  replied to  GregTx @1.2.1    4 weeks ago

Some folks have preconceived assumptions about people who live in the South.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2.4  devangelical  replied to  Texan1211 @1.2.3    4 weeks ago

some folks who live in the south can't help but to reinforce those assumptions...

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.2.5  Trout Giggles  replied to  GregTx @1.2.1    4 weeks ago

they like to keep people poor in the south

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.2.6  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @1.2.4    4 weeks ago
some folks who live in the south can't help but to reinforce those assumptions...

Like Yankees, eh?

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2.7  devangelical  replied to  Texan1211 @1.2.6    4 weeks ago

I was born in the south.

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
1.2.8  GregTx  replied to  devangelical @1.2.7    4 weeks ago

[]

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2.9  devangelical  replied to  GregTx @1.2.8    4 weeks ago

[]

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.2.10  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @1.2.7    4 weeks ago

[removed][]

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
1.2.11  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  devangelical @1.2.7    4 weeks ago

[]

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2.12  devangelical  replied to  devangelical @1.2.7    3 weeks ago

oops

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2.13  devangelical  replied to  devangelical @1.2.12    3 weeks ago

sorry, not sorry ...

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
1.2.14  GregTx  replied to  GregTx @1.2.8    3 weeks ago

Wgaf?

 
 
 
GregTx
PhD Guide
1.2.15  GregTx  replied to  GregTx @1.2.14    3 weeks ago

Not me...

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2.16  devangelical  replied to  devangelical @1.2.13    3 weeks ago

bfd

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kavika @1    4 weeks ago

And I'm sure those union jobs will be protected in the trade deals we make with countries producing non union cars

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.3.1  devangelical  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3    4 weeks ago

your soon to be convicted felon hero has already promised as much, if he's elected, with his 100% tariffs...

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.3.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3    4 weeks ago
And I'm sure those union jobs will be protected in the trade deals we make with countries producing non union cars

Good old 100% Trump has guaranteed it.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.3  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kavika @1.3.2    4 weeks ago

Actually he DID IT in his first term.

How long has this country fucked our workers?

Didn't the baby boomers buy the cheaper foreign cars decades ago?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.4  Vic Eldred  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.3    4 weeks ago

From the summer of 2018 when tariffs on aluminum & steel were in effect:

But Trump has made it clear that he thinks the European Union, Canada, Mexico, and China are unfair trade partners, abusing the United States’ alliance by artificially keeping their interest rates low and imposing high tariffs. On Thursday and Friday of last week, Trump appeared to be  picking a fight with the US’s trade allies on Twitter .

There are two schools of thought among economists: Either this is an empty threat to increase his leverage in trade negotiations and get other countries to lower their tariffs or Trump is absolutely serious about imposing more tariffs — this time on a consumer good. At this point, with the tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum, Robert Litan, a former Bill Clinton aide and Brookings Institution fellow, said it’s time to take the president at his word.



You have to protect those union workers otherwise those companies will make the cars elswhere.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.3.5  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.3    4 weeks ago
Actually he DID IT in his first term.

He did institute some tariffs and as soon as he did those countries instituted them again us. 

Soon you'll be telling me that China paid for the tariff costs...LOL

How long has this country fucked our workers?

Since the Industrial Revolution, and when the unions came into being that changed and now that conservatives and corporations went about trying to destroy the unions now the pendulum is swinging back and the unions are on the organizing drives and winning.

Didn't the baby boomers buy the cheaper foreign cars decades ago?

You might want to ask a baby boomer, in fact you should ask yourself, I believe that you qualify as a baby boomer.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.3.6  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.4    4 weeks ago

Again this has nothing to do with the article but in that time period the US Steel industry was very antiquated and far behind both the Asia and European steel manufacturers.

Did the Japanese ever complete the purchase of USS? Oh, they did just this month.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.3.7  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @1.3.6    3 weeks ago

geez, they should have just bought off the republicans 83+ years ago, bummer...

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.3.8  devangelical  replied to  devangelical @1.3.7    3 weeks ago

... could have picked up a steel plant and an oil company for a song back then.

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
2  charger 383    4 weeks ago

Work Union=Live Better

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  charger 383 @2    4 weeks ago
Work Union=Live Better

Agreed.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
2.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  charger 383 @2    4 weeks ago

My dad was a UAW member and then he became a UMW member. The whole family was pro-union

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
2.2.1  charger 383  replied to  Trout Giggles @2.2    4 weeks ago

UTWA member for my summer job going to college. Left me with a Union attitude in Management, both good and bad but made me strong.  

 
 
 
SteevieGee
Professor Silent
2.3  SteevieGee  replied to  charger 383 @2    4 weeks ago

Enjoying your weekend?  Thank a union.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
2.3.1  devangelical  replied to  SteevieGee @2.3    4 weeks ago

40 hour work week, overtime, sick pay, PTO, paid vacations, pensions ...

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
2.3.2  charger 383  replied to  devangelical @2.3.1    4 weeks ago

all very good things

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
2.3.3  devangelical  replied to  charger 383 @2.3.2    4 weeks ago

... progressive things.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
2.3.4  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  SteevieGee @2.3    4 weeks ago

[deleted][]

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.3.5  Texan1211  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @2.3.4    4 weeks ago

I think those wanting to join a union should, and those who don't shouldn't be forced.

I realize that doesn't set well with those wanting to remove choice for workers.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
2.3.6  devangelical  replied to  Texan1211 @2.3.5    4 weeks ago
I realize that doesn't set well with those wanting to remove choice for workers.

like employers that won't offer comparable wages and benefits and retaliate against unionization attempts?

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.3.7  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @2.3.6    4 weeks ago
like employers that won't offer comparable wages and benefits and retaliate against unionization attempts?

Absolutely nothing even remotely close.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
2.3.8  devangelical  replied to  devangelical @2.3.6    4 weeks ago

...

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
3  evilone    4 weeks ago

Some of these auto manufacturers have announced opening lines in Mexico for cheaper labor costs. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  evilone @3    4 weeks ago

The unionization move in the US will probably cause many changes in the auto manufacturing world including geographical changes in plant location.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4  Trout Giggles    4 weeks ago

I always suspected the reason so many auto plants were opening in the South is because of the anti-union attitude and lower wages overall

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Expert
4.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Trout Giggles @4    4 weeks ago

I have been dismayed at the rapid change in the prevailing attitude toward unions in WV over the last decade or so.  It was the heart of the early fight to unionize, and now they have repeatedly voted in anti-union politicians who passed right-to-work laws.  The governor owns mines that have repeated safety violations.

About one-third of violations issued at delinquent Justice mines were listed as what MSHA calls "Significant and Substantial," meaning the observed conditions at the mine present a reasonable likelihood that an injury or illness will occur. Nine violations were for conditions that federal regulators say placed miners in "imminent danger" of death or serious physical harm.

Unionization isn't just about pay and vacation time.  Sometimes, unions are advocating for workers not getting killed on the job, because owners don't give a damn.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1    4 weeks ago

Become a Governor, break the law, and hurrah you too can run for Senator.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Expert
4.1.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  Kavika @4.1.1    4 weeks ago

Well, he was breaking the law, not to mention stiffing people on his bills, long before he was governor.  Somehow, he's managed not to be forced into bankruptcy, and even be re-elected. 

But the tide may be turning.

A Virginia bank has placed official   notice to auction   The Greenbrier Sporting Club to satisfy a multi-million dollar debt from Gov. Jim Justice and his family.

The   Greenbrier Sporting Club   is a private club offering memberships to people who buy real estate surrounding The Greenbrier resort.

Carter Bank & Trust   has been moving to collect   $300 million from Governor Justice and his family companies. The debts were personally-guaranteed by Justice, his wife Cathy and their son Jay, who runs the family’s coal operations. The debts applied to several branches of the family’s business network, including Greenbrier Hotel Corporation, Greenbrier Golf and Tennis Club and Greenbrier Sporting Club.

A legal notice reflecting the move to auction Greenbrier Sporting Club property and collect the money to satisfy the debt appeared today in The Charleston Gazette-Mail.
 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
4.1.3  TᵢG  replied to  Kavika @4.1.1    4 weeks ago

… and especially PotUS.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.4  seeder  Kavika   replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.2    4 weeks ago

Sounds like Justice is a mini Trump.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Expert
4.1.5  sandy-2021492  replied to  Kavika @4.1.4    4 weeks ago

In more ways than one.  He refused to live in the Governor's Mansion, too, which required the state to pay for him to travel several hours between his home and Charleston on the regular.  Sound familiar?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.6  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.5    4 weeks ago
He refused to live in the Governor's Mansion, too

Like Gavin Newsom?

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Expert
4.1.7  sandy-2021492  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.1.6    4 weeks ago

Justice lives 112 miles from Charleston, WV.  Newsom lives in Sacramento.  Justice is also in violation of the state's Constitution.

It's silly and disingenuous to try to equate the two.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
4.1.8  devangelical  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.7    4 weeks ago
silly and disingenuous

.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.9  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.7    4 weeks ago

Governor Jared Polis and his family do not live in the Colorado mansion.

Governor Phil Murphy doesn’t live in the Gov’s mansion.

Neither does Gov. Josh Shapiro.

Nor does Gov. Ned Lamont.

Or Gov. John Carney.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Expert
4.1.10  sandy-2021492  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.1.9    4 weeks ago

Do their states' constitutions require it?

Justice's requires that he live in the capitol city.  He lives over a hundred miles away.  The state pays to transport him back and forth.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.11  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.10    4 weeks ago

If you went mansion by mansion, you will find about as many has lived outside the governor’s mansion as in it across the country over the last 50 years.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Expert
4.1.12  sandy-2021492  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.1.11    4 weeks ago

I notice you don't answer my question regarding their state's constitutions.

Justice refuses to abide by his.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.13  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.12    4 weeks ago
I notice you don't answer my question regarding their state's constitutions.

I'm too lazy to look that up.

What is the legal definition of "reside"?

Should we see the Governor's re-election after this issue had surfaced and been litigated as an indication of the public's indifference.  Maybe they realize that improvements in telecommunications and transportation render that section of the 150 year old constitution.

 
 
 
SteevieGee
Professor Silent
4.1.14  SteevieGee  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.1.6    4 weeks ago
Like Gavin Newsom?

Like Ronald Reagan.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.15  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  SteevieGee @4.1.14    4 weeks ago
Like Ronald Reagan.

Ronald Reagan was the last CA governor to live in the Governor's mansion, seven since then have declined.

 
 
 
SteevieGee
Professor Silent
4.1.16  SteevieGee  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.1.15    3 weeks ago

Ronald Reagan never lived in the Governor's mansion.  Nancy refused to move into it calling it a 'firetrap' and the small government Reagan spent millions on a new mansion in Carmichael.  Since then no governor has lived in the new mansion (which is still state owned) and only Jerry Brown has lived in the old one.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.17  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  SteevieGee @4.1.16    3 weeks ago

Gov Ronald Reagan lived in the Governor’s mansion on 15th and H Street in Downtown Sacramento for three months before moving out. He was the last Governor to live at this address.  The State of California built a new Governor’s mansion in the 1970s in Carmichael,  the mansion began construction under Ronald Reagan’s time.  

 
 
 
SteevieGee
Professor Silent
4.1.18  SteevieGee  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.1.17    3 weeks ago

Ok you made me get out my wiki volumes.  Yes Reagan did live there for 'a few months' while making his own housing arrangements.  In 2015 Jerry Brown moved into the mansion making it once again the official residence.  Oddly, in 2019 Gavin Newsom also lived briefly in the mansion before buying a home in Fair Oaks.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5  seeder  Kavika     4 weeks ago

Meanwhile in Ky:

UAW Strike At Daimler Truck Averted At 11th Hour : NPR

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
5.1  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @5    3 weeks ago

domino effect.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
6  seeder  Kavika     4 weeks ago

In more Mercedes Benz news. 

Mercedes workers in Alabama petition to hold union vote

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
6.1  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @6    3 weeks ago

people usually vote for their wallets, and that union wage scale will put auto workers in the top 1% of income earners in that goober shithole that still exists in the antebellum south. alabama, the asshole of america...

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
6.1.1  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @6.1    3 weeks ago

Your "math" is awfully fuzzy and wrong.

unless you think union workers on the lines make over 400k per year, of course 

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
6.1.2  devangelical  replied to  Texan1211 @6.1.1    3 weeks ago

alabama ain't texass.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
6.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @6.1.2    3 weeks ago

That's very good. Alabama is also not any of the other states, either.

Now that we have established widely recognized facts which no one has disputed, let's move on.

Now, about your false claim.

where did you learn that auto workers on union scale wages would be in the top 1%---or even the top 10%--- of Alabama earners?

I can't believe the schools that taught you Alabama wasn't Texas taught you fuzzy math. Or how to spell  Texas incorrectly.

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
7  charger 383    3 weeks ago

I am a supporter of Unions; but, I am very disappointed the way leaders of BLET (Locomotive Engineers)  came out against it's members best interest in the proxy fight for control of Norfolk Southern railroad by siding with Ancora who wants to take over and use Precision Scheduled Railroading method of operation and plans to cut employees and gut the railroad. Other unions there have taken a different approach..   

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
7.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  charger 383 @7    3 weeks ago

I saw that, charger and was wondering why they would do that, it doesn't make sense on the surface.

 
 

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