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Taliban To Resume Stoning Women In Public For Adultery

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  krishna  •  3 weeks ago  •  73 comments

Taliban To Resume Stoning Women In Public For Adultery
Girls and women in the war-torn country have no access to education, employment and public spaces.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


You say it's a violation of women's rights when we stone them to death. But we will soon implement the punishment for adultery. We will flog women in public. We will stone them to death in public," he said.

"The Taliban's work did not end with the takeover of Kabul, it has only just begun," Akhundzada added.

Afghanistan's women have faced numerous challenges since the Taliban returned to power in 2021. Girls and women in the war-torn country have no access to education, employment and public spaces.

For many families, the only path forward for their daughters is marriage, "regardless of their consent," the AFP said quoting a young student.

"Depression is widespread. The rate of suicide for girls has gone up a lot in the last two years. It is tragic," she told the news agency.


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Krishna
Professor Expert
1  seeder  Krishna    3 weeks ago

“Now, no one is standing beside them to save them from Taliban punishments. The international community has chosen to remain silent in the face of these violations of women’s rights.”

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @1    3 weeks ago

Wrong, Krishna, they're not silent.  They're all too busy marching, demonstrating and protesting in support of terrorists these days.  One might wonder if there is a reason why most of the primitive barbarians and terrorists in this world are.........Oh, I guess I better not say it, cause everyone is going to jump on me for being racist.  

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2  seeder  Krishna    3 weeks ago

In an audio broadcast on the Taliban-controlled Radio Television  Afghanistan  last Saturday, Akhundzada said: “We will flog the women … we will stone them to death in public [for adultery].

“You may call it a violation of women’s rights when we publicly stone or flog them for committing adultery because they conflict with your democratic principles,” he said, adding: “[But] I represent Allah, and you represent Satan.”

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
2.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @2    3 weeks ago

Well, I represented a lot of different people, sometimes even some who broke the law, but I don't think any of my clients were Satan in disguise. 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
3  seeder  Krishna    3 weeks ago

Most recently, in February, the Taliban  executed people  in public at stadiums in Jawzjan and Ghazni provinces. The militant group has urged people to attend executions and punishments as a “lesson” but banned filming or photography.

What? 

We can't even post reels of the executions on Instagram?

That's violating our rights to free speech!

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
4  Ronin2    3 weeks ago

Twenty damn years of fighting and nation building; and like normal the US has nothing to show for it.

Afghanistan is right back to where it was before we went in.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Ronin2 @4    3 weeks ago
Twenty damn years of fighting and nation building; and like normal the US has nothing to show for it. Afghanistan is right back to where it was before we went in.

Have our efforts with other Muslims countries been significantly more successful?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.1.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Krishna @4.1    3 weeks ago

How about Indonesia and Malaysia.  Two majority Muslim countries, colonized by the West, occupied by Japan during WW II, fought for their independence.  They both had political turbulence following their freedom and now are two educated, exciting places heading tom the future.  I don't think that it is the religion as much as it's the culture that keeps the Arab and Persian world (with some exceptions) so disfunctionale.  Arabs also do quite well here and in other countries, they just can seem to move forward in North Africa or the MidEast.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5  seeder  Krishna    3 weeks ago

I was wondering how many other countries still do stoning-- so i googled it:

Do any countries still do stoning?
Contemporary legal status and use. As of September 2010, stoning is a punishment that is included in the laws in some countries including Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Iran, Somalia, Yemen and some predominantly Muslim states in northern Nigeria as punishment for Zina ("adultery by married persons").
 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
5.1  afrayedknot  replied to  Krishna @5    3 weeks ago

“I was wondering how many other countries still do stoning-- so i googled it:”

And I was wondering how many other countries still do capital punishment; the results are just as repulsive: 

“These are China, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, the United States, and Yemen.”

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
5.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  afrayedknot @5.1    3 weeks ago

APPLES<  >ORANGES

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Participates
5.1.2  bugsy  replied to  afrayedknot @5.1    3 weeks ago

Where exactly is stoning legal in the US?

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
5.1.3  Freefaller  replied to  bugsy @5.1.2    3 weeks ago

You may have misread the post, it does not say stoning is legal anywhere in the US, it does say capital punishment is legal in the US

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
6  Drinker of the Wry    3 weeks ago

Well they'll stone you when you're trying to be so good;
They'll stone you just like they said they would.
They'll stone you when you're tryin' to go home;
And they'll stone you when you're there all alone.

But I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned!

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
6.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @6    3 weeks ago
But I would not feel so all alone Everybody must get stoned!

Been there-- done that! jrSmiley_7_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
6.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @6.1    3 weeks ago

And we didn't even have to commit adultery.

 
 
 
Igknorantzruls
Freshman Quiet
6.2  Igknorantzruls  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @6    3 weeks ago

Trump wants the DOD to purchase 50,000 of his MAGA Moron Magnificent Seven Sin Bibles of Babble sent over to be used as shields from those Rocks, that Robert Zimmerman did overturn, while doing the Stoning...

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
6.2.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Igknorantzruls @6.2    3 weeks ago
wants the DOD to purchase 50,000 of his MAGA Moron Magnificent Seven Sin Bibles of Babble

The DoD is over 2 million folks if you count the reserves and another 800,000 DoD civilians.

 
 
 
Igknorantzruls
Freshman Quiet
6.2.2  Igknorantzruls  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @6.2.1    3 weeks ago

think Trump would give em a dictator tot for a day, discount ?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
6.2.3  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Igknorantzruls @6.2.2    3 weeks ago

Beats me, don’t think that he would be awarded a DoD contract, too much paperwork.

 
 
 
fineline
Freshman Silent
6.2.4  fineline  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @6.2.1    3 weeks ago

Largest employer in the world.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
6.2.5  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  fineline @6.2.4    3 weeks ago

Indeed, big government.

 
 
 
Jeremy Retired in NC
Professor Expert
7  Jeremy Retired in NC    3 weeks ago

I can't be the only one to notice how certain groups are quite.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
7.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Jeremy Retired in NC @7    3 weeks ago

Peaceful.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
7.2  Ozzwald  replied to  Jeremy Retired in NC @7    3 weeks ago
I can't be the only one to notice how certain groups are quite.

Quite what?

 
 
 
fineline
Freshman Silent
7.2.1  fineline  replied to  Ozzwald @7.2    3 weeks ago

[removed][]

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
7.3  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Jeremy Retired in NC @7    3 weeks ago
I can't be the only one to notice how certain groups are quite.

You might be-- you never know!

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8  Kavika     3 weeks ago

Singapore would be a good example of a mixture of religions and a very modern country with many outstanding systems. There are Muslims, Buddhists, Christians, Hindus, Taoism, Confucianism and number of indigenous religions.

Singapore does have the death penalty and it is hanging. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
8.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Kavika @8    3 weeks ago

Isn't that where that kid got caned about 20 some years ago for vandalism?

I hear Singapore is a very, nice clean, city

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Trout Giggles @8.1    3 weeks ago
Isn't that where that kid got caned about 20 some years ago for vandalism?

Yes, it is Trout.

I hear Singapore is a very, nice clean, city

Clean isn't the word it is sparkling, if you spit on the street you get fined. It is modern, pretty much one of a kind one of my favorite cities in the world, oh and I forgot to mention safe, very safe. A women can get on the trains at 2am and will not be bothered by anyone. 

When you enter Singapore at the international airport which a marvel itself one of the first things that you see is a sign that tells you in Singapore transporting drugs can be a death penalty and they are very serious about it.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Trout Giggles @8.1    3 weeks ago

Very clean a big contrast from Arab cities.  Kuwait City being one of the dirtiest that I been in.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
8.1.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  Kavika @8.1.1    3 weeks ago

I wish I could fine men for spitting on the sidewalk...I bet littering gets you a date with the CANE

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.4  Kavika   replied to  Trout Giggles @8.1.3    3 weeks ago

For sure

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
8.1.5  Freefaller  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.2    3 weeks ago
Kuwait City being one of the dirtiest

Been there twice but never noticed it being particularly dirty, certainly I have seen far dirtier places

To be fair I only visited the gold district in the city

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.6  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Freefaller @8.1.5    3 weeks ago

More than 2 million tons of solid waste is generated annually in that tiny country.  There are dumpsters around the city instead of engineered landfills.

I haven’t been there in over 15 years but I saw piles of garbage in empty city lots, stray dogs and cats abused and foreign workers degradation. 

I’ve traveled and lived in many places world wide, and always found multiple things that I liked wherever I was except in the ME.  I enjoyed the great hospitality that an individual family shows to a visitor but that’s about it for these little backward and cruel people.

 
 
 
fineline
Freshman Silent
8.1.7  fineline  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.6    3 weeks ago

Not unlike the white evangelical trash in rural and urban slums here ?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.8  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  fineline @8.1.7    3 weeks ago
Not unlike the white evangelical trash in rural and urban slums here ?

Do you have some stats?

 
 
 
fineline
Freshman Silent
8.1.9  fineline  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.8    3 weeks ago

"these little backward and cruel people"  Thought you didn't use broad defamatory statements ? Do you have some stats ? Just blowing off about how worldly you consider yourself to be ?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.10  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  fineline @8.1.9    3 weeks ago
Thought you didn't use broad defamatory statements ?

I doubt that you thought at all.

Do you have some stats ?

What stats do you want to see, the limited progress of the Arabs over the last 700 years?

Just blowing off about how worldly you consider yourself to be ?

How many countries have you lived in?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.11  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.6    3 weeks ago
I enjoyed the great hospitality that an individual family shows to a visitor but that’s about it for these little backward and cruel people.

Yes, the individual families show great hospitality to strangers. By calling them backward and cruel Drinker shows me that you may not know/understand them. Are there cruel ones, without a doubt, are they backward ones, once again without a doubt. I have some friends here in the US, in California actually that are from the ME an ancient people that have survived for millenniums in one of the harshest environments in the world. The clan system is thousands of years old and they are generally a very peaceful people but certainly when needed can and will fight. I could never call them backward and cruel people, I do owe them a considerable debt for their friendship and courage in the face of some pretty daunting episodes.

For centuries one of the ways to stigmatize a people was to call them savage, uneducated, barbaric, backward etc I'm sure you are aware of world history and more to the point US history. 

So, I'll keep trying to look at people as individuals and not throw them into a pot of cruel backward people. Kind of like weeding the garden.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.12  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.11    3 weeks ago
So, I'll keep trying to look at people as individuals and not throw them into a pot of cruel backward people. Kind of like weeding the garden.

Good luck understanding the difference between Indonesians and Arabs in terms of culture and lifestyle. 

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.13  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.11    3 weeks ago

Some of the bravest and most distinguished analysts from the Middle East emphasize that region's culture of cruelty. Kanan Makiya titled his 1994 book about Arabs   Cruelty and Silence . Fouad Ajami writes about Beirut being " lost to a new reign of cruelty ," about Iraq's " plunder and cruelty and sectarian animus ," and about the region's " cruelty, waste, and confusion ."

  aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZGFuaWVscGlwZXMub3JnL3BpY3MvbmV3L3RodW1icy84OTUuanBn Issa bin Zayed Al Nahyan.

aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZGFuaWVscGlwZXMub3JnL3BpY3MvbmV3L3RodW1icy84OTYuanBn Bassam Nabulsi.

aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZGFuaWVscGlwZXMub3JnL3BpY3MvbmV3L3RodW1icy84OTcuanBn Issa shooting around Shah Poor.

aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZGFuaWVscGlwZXMub3JnL3BpY3MvbmV3L3RodW1icy84OTguanBn Issa stuffing sand down Shah Poor's mouth.

aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZGFuaWVscGlwZXMub3JnL3BpY3MvbmV3L3RodW1icy84OTkuanBn Issa directing the cameraman.

aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZGFuaWVscGlwZXMub3JnL3BpY3MvbmV3L3RodW1icy85MDAuanBn Issa running over Shah Poor.

That cruelty, usually at a remove from outsiders, became cinematically vivid on April 22, 2009, when ABC News aired a tape of a prince from the United Arab Emirates sadistically torturing an Afghan merchant he accused of dishonesty. No less instructive were the passive reactions of his government and of American officials. The story reveals much and is worth pondering:

In Abu Dhabi, the UAE's largest and most powerful emirate, the Nahyan family has long ruled and dominated. After the 2004 death of Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, who had ruled the emirate since its independence in 1971, his long-restrained 22 royal sons and grandsons reveled in their new-found freedom of action. One of them in particular, Issa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, a younger brother of Abu Dhabi's current ruler and president of the seven-member United Arab Emirates federation, Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan (b. 1948), went crazy. "It's like you flipped a switch and the man took a wrong turn in his life and started getting violent," comments Bassam Nabulsi, 50, of Houston, Texas, a native of Lebanon and former business associate of Issa's.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.14  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.11    3 weeks ago

Domestic abuse and gender-based violence in the Arab world remains depressingly widespread. A recent   report by UN Women   estimates that at least 37% of women in Arab countries have experienced some level of domestic violence. High-profile incidents and demonstrations have, in recent months, highlighted the prevalence of the issue. In May, 17-year-old   Menna Abdel Aziz   made the news in Egypt and around the world when she posted a TikTok video showing her facial bruises after an alleged sexual assault. Though a police investigation would eventually back her story, she still had to face charges of “misusing social media networks, inciting debauchery, and violating Egyptian family values.” Then, on July 1, some 50 Egyptian women on social media accused an Egyptian student of sexual assault and rape, with the number of complaints steadily rising on the Instagram account   @assaultpolice . The ongoing campaign has been called Egypt’s #MeToo moment.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.15  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.12    3 weeks ago
Good luck understanding the difference between Indonesians and Arabs in terms of culture and lifestyle. 

KInd of like understanding the difference between American Indians and whites don't you think? 

Unless they moved Indonesia they are not in the ME.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.16  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.11    3 weeks ago

For many Arabs, Animal welfare and animal rights has little relevance to the Arab world.

It is "a Western cause", like gay marriage and women's issues. Human rights, they believe, should come first.

Animal rights activists, likewise, are often seen as misguided radicals, both in the Arab countries and the rest of the world.

There is merit in the view that some in  the West and Israel   are more concerned about the rights of animals in the Middle East than the rights of its people to freedom, dignity, and self-determination. But their dismissal of Arabs, their welfare and interests is again not a strong argument against caring for animals.

Human rights and animal rights go hand in hand, especially if we see the issue not from the angle of political priorities, but from the angle of ethics and compassion. Studies consistently show that animals are much  more sentient  than we ever imagined them to be - meaning they suffer both physically and emotionally.

The Arab world is by no means  the worst  when it comes to animal welfare, but there is a problem and it is multifaceted. Many Arabs see animals as property and not as conscious beings, a misconception that makes cruelty to them easier.

aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubmV3YXJhYi5jb20vQ29udGVudC9lbmdsaXNoL2ltYWdlcy9lbmdsaXNoY2FwdGlvbi5qcGc~ Human rights and animal rights go hand in hand when viewed from the angle of ethics and compassion.

In urban settings, this particularly affects dogs, cats, horses, and donkeys - especially strays.
From children torturing cats or using them as toys on the streets, to  municipalities  shooting stray dogs - and allegedly using their carcasses to produce fertiliser - are common practices in many Middle Eastern cities.
Aside from cruelty, there is also negligence. There seems to be little awareness regarding the importance of spaying and vaccinating stray animals for the sake of humans themselves.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.17  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.15    3 weeks ago

KInd of like understanding  the difference between American Indians and whites don't you think?

Not at all.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.18  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.11    3 weeks ago

There's an Arabic proverb that helps epxlain the violence that's become a feature of the Arab world: "Knowledge in childhood is like engraving on a stone." What a child learns is rooted in his mind and remains the cornerstone of his conscience throughout his life. The sad truth in the Arab world is that our children are being taught fundamentalist Islamic ideas that glorify violence, at least since the 1990s. It's long past time to undertake a comprehensive review of our schools' curricula to assess the concepts our children have been absorbing for far too long and from which their cultural heritage is formed.

In most Muslim-majority countries, the religious and historical curricula contain narratives that violate the principles of human rights and international humanitarian law, yet they are taught to our impressionable children as sources of holiness and pride—even given a tinge of divinity.

Consider a prominent example: During the first Hijri centuries ("according to Muslim historians," our children are taught), the armies of our ancestors occupied countries that did not initiate aggression against them—Egypt, the Levant, Iraq, Persia, North Africa, and Andalusia—and forced the people there to enter the new religion or pay a tribute to avoid murder. Our children are taught that they took women as captives for the "conquering soldiers" and captured children to be small slaves. Another famous historian writes about how the conquering Muslims burned one of the largest libraries in Persia between 642-644 AD because the books did not "comport with their religious beliefs."

These practices, which embody full-fledged war crimes according to the rules of today's international humanitarian law, are called in our present curricula "conquest and victory granted by God" and taught to children as glorious, heroic actions by our ancestors that we must strive to emulate.

Remember how   ISIS   and   Taliban   joyfully destroyed the very precious and valuable archeological sites in Palmyra and Afghanistan?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.19  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.16    3 weeks ago

This doesn't happen in the US and the West? Come on Drinker

Have you ever been to a pig farm or slaughter house, how about a mink breeding or a foxuse farm where they are kept in tiny cages until they go crazy and start attacking each other and then are skinned so some fat ass can wear the skin around her neck.

Wake the fuck up, Drinker.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.20  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.18    3 weeks ago

Sound like the Bible, Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny.

That book burning must be a thing since the Spanish destroyed thousands of codies of the Maya. Backward asswipes.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.21  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.19    3 weeks ago

Saudi Arabia is one of the cruelest countries I’ve been in.

I don’t need to wake the fuck up, I was wide awake there.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.22  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.20    3 weeks ago

Perhaps as they are hundreds of years behind the rest of the world.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.23  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.17    3 weeks ago

Then you understand neither nor history.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.24  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.21    3 weeks ago
I don’t need to wake the fuck up, I was wide awake there.

I'm sure you were.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.25  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.23    3 weeks ago

Please explain Arab failure to us.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.26  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.14    3 weeks ago

Did you ever look at the stats for the US on domestic abuse and sexual violence? You might want to MMIW.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.27  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.25    3 weeks ago
Please explain Arab failure to us.

You're doing your best to show it, what could I add to your expertise and having been to SA. 

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.28  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.26    3 weeks ago

You defending Arab culture is like those here defending Trump.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.29  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.27    3 weeks ago

Two eminent historians discussed 1,400 years of Islamic civilization in the Mediterranean during a program held at the Library on May 7. The question "What Went Wrong and Why?" was debated by Bernard Lewis, Emeritus Professor at Princeton University and author of a best-selling book with a similar title, and Mohamed Arkoun, Emeritus Professor at the Sorbonne in Paris. The program, which filled the Library's Coolidge Auditorium to capacity, was sponsored by the Library's African and Middle Eastern Division and Office of Scholarly Programs. The program was chaired by the Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, with Prosser Gifford, director of the Library's Office of Scholarly Programs and the John Kluge Center, moderating a question-and-answer period.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.30  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.28    3 weeks ago
You defending Arab culture is like those here defending Trump.

That is where you are way off base, simply go back to my first comment and try and regroup your thoughts to what I'm saying, it had nothing to do with Arab culture at all but as individual people vs your definition. Simple as that.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.31  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.30    3 weeks ago

Arabs had a golden age for six hundred years between the eighth and thirteenth centuries, then the stopped intellectual advancement.

Now they have far fewer scientists, engineers, and technicians per capita than most of the world.  Is it simple prejudice that restricts Arabs from winning a Nobel prize in Science.  Do their universities publish important papers.  Again, there are great Arab scientists but they are all working in the West, not their home countries.

Beyond science, Arabs publish few books of any topic.  They are awarded few patents especially when compared to Pacific rim countries that were third world countries one hundred years ago.  That does mean that Arabs excel at nothing, they are experts at desalination, falconry, and camel reproduction.  

I have attended several military schools with allied students.  Those from Turkey and Jordan were serious and good students, those from Saudi, Kuwait and Egypt were a joke.  It’s no wonder that little Israel always kicks their ass.

Ask yourself, in what area do Arabs contribute to the world’s intellectual improvement; science, math, literature, art, governance, legal systems, agriculture.  

Exactly.  If it wasn’t for oil the world wouldn’t give two shits about these little people.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.32  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.31    3 weeks ago
Ask yourself, in what area do Arabs contribute to the world’s intellectual improvement; science, math, literature, art, governance, legal systems, agriculture.  

Why would I ask myself that question? As I told you and wrote I'm not defending Arab culture what part of that don't you understand? Or do you have some type of need to babble on about something that I'm not defending or supporting? 

Carry on if your ego needs stroking and you need to listen to yourself pontificate.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.33  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.32    3 weeks ago
Why would I ask myself that question?

It was a rhetorical question.

But feel free to carry on about something I'm not supporting or defending if it strokes your ego.

Not ego, facts and observations.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.1.34  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.1.33    3 weeks ago
It was a rhetorical question.

Oh, I'm sure that it was. /s 

Not ego, facts and observations.

To what end I've told you I'm not supporting Arab culture and nothing in my comments indicates that I am. So it seems you are commenting to satisfy your ego or to hear yourself pontificate. 

Carry on if you feel the need.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.1.35  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.1.34    3 weeks ago
So it seems you are commenting to satisfy your ego or to hear yourself pontificate. 

Ego’s get satisfied when they receive approval from others which you’re not providing, so that’s not it.  Pontificate, perhaps, I think many here are clueless about the Arab culture and their circumstances.  

The young there see their future and the lack of respect that their governments and elites have for them, hence the Arab Spring.   Israel isn’t what prevents their bloom, it’s themselves.

I got the pontification worked out know, let’s find some other topics.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
8.1.36  Gsquared  replied to  Trout Giggles @8.1    3 weeks ago

Singapore is very nice, very clean and, as Kavika mentioned, modern.  There are a variety of interesting things to see there, and it is quite diverse.  I spent a few days there in 2018.  One day we went to a beautiful Hindu temple while there was a ceremony going on, which was really interesting.  They have an absolutely amazing large National Orchid Garden.  We went to a great museum.  You can see a bit of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia from the top of their highest hill.  And, the food is great.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8    3 weeks ago

It’s a great destination, smart happy people, great food and wonderful sights to see.  An incredible story of innovation during a city/country complete makeover.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
8.2.1  Kavika   replied to  Drinker of the Wry @8.2    3 weeks ago

It is also the most expensive city in the world.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
8.2.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Kavika @8.2.1    3 weeks ago

Yes, it has bounced around the top ten for a while now.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
8.3  Gsquared  replied to  Kavika @8    3 weeks ago

Singapore is a great place to visit.  Very hot, though.

 
 
 
fineline
Freshman Silent
9  fineline    3 weeks ago

Another success story for religion !

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
9.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  fineline @9    3 weeks ago

Exactly, atheism will wipe sex crimes out.

 
 
 
fineline
Freshman Silent
9.1.1  fineline  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @9.1    3 weeks ago

Never know until its tried ! 

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
9.1.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  fineline @9.1.1    3 weeks ago

How are they doing so far?

 
 

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