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Jordan’s government struggles to contain unrest as Gaza protests grow

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  kavika  •  3 weeks ago  •  4 comments

Jordan’s government struggles to contain unrest as Gaza protests grow

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Hundreds of protesters gathered in the Jordanian capital Tuesday for a third straight night to call for an end to Israel’s war in Gaza, clashing with baton-carrying riot police before tear gas rained down on them.

On Wednesday night, demonstrators were back on the streets. “Open the borders,” they chanted.


Though there have been regular protests in Amman, Jordan, throughout the nearly six-month war, the government has largely managed to contain the situation by aligning itself with public sentiment — harshly criticizing Israel’s conduct of the war and championing the Palestinian cause. But the scenes this week appeared more spontaneous, the crowds larger and the anger more raw, sending shock waves through the country’s powerful security establishment.

“Jordan is in an unenviable position,” said Saud al-Sharafat, a former Brig. Gen. in the Jordanian General Intelligence Directorate and founder of the Sharafat ِCenter for the Study of Globalization and Terrorism. The grinding conflict in Gaza, and the soaring Palestinian   death toll , are testing the state’s “ability to maintain the tempo that exists now, so that [things] do not get out of control.


The Kingdom of Jordan occupies a unique position in the Middle East. It is a close and longtime ally of the United States, receiving more than $1 billion annually in economic and military   aid . In 1994, Jordan signed a   peace treaty   with neighboring Israel. But the mass displacement of Palestinians during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war — known to Arabs as the   “nakba,”   or catastrophe — forever altered the country’s demographics.

Jordan is home to more than 2 million Palestinian refugees, most of whom have Jordanian citizenship. Analysts   estimate   half of the population is of Palestinian descent. For many here, geographically and emotionally, the war in Gaza feels very close.

Jordanian authorities — who typically show little tolerance for public demonstrations — have sanctioned weekly protests after Friday prayers.

“It seems, over time, government institutions learned their lessons and started giving space [for people] to relieve tension,” said Sharafat.

LINK TO SEEDED ARTICLE: 

Hundreds of protesters gathered in the Jordanian capital Tuesday for a third straight night to call for an end to Israel’s war in Gaza, clashing with baton-carrying riot police before tear gas rained down on them.

On Wednesday night, demonstrators were back on the streets. “Open the borders,” they ch


Though there have been regular protests in Amman, Jordan, throughout the nearly six-month war, the government has largely managed to contain the situation by aligning itself with public sentiment — harshly criticizing Israel’s conduct of the war and championing the Palestinian cause. But the scenes this week appeared more spontaneous, the crowds larger and the anger more raw, sending shock waves through the country’s powerful security establishment.

“Jordan is in an unenviable position,” said Saud al-Sharafat, a former Brig. Gen. in the Jordanian General Intelligence Directorate and founder of the Sharafat ِCenter for the Study of Globalization and Terrorism. The grinding conflict in Gaza, and the soaring Palestinian   death toll , are testing the state’s “ability to maintain the tempo that exists now, so that [things] do not get out of control.


The Kingdom of Jordan occupies a unique position in the Middle East. It is a close and longtime ally of the United States, receiving more than $1 billion annually in economic and military   aid . In 1994, Jordan signed a   peace treaty   with neighboring Israel. But the mass displacement of Palestinians during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war — known to Arabs as the   “nakba,”   or catastrophe — forever altered the country’s demographics.

Jordan is home to more than 2 million Palestinian refugees, most of whom have Jordanian citizenship. Analysts   estimate   half of the population is of Palestinian descent. For many here, geographically and emotionally, the war in Gaza feels very close.

Jordanian authorities — who typically show little tolerance for public demonstrations — have sanctioned weekly protests after Friday prayers.

“It seems, over time, government institutions learned their lessons and started giving space [for people] to relieve tension,” said Sharafat.

LINK TO SEEDED ARTICLE:  

Hundreds of protesters gathered in the Jordanian capital Tuesday for a third straight night to call for an end to Israel’s war in Gaza, clashing with baton-carrying riot police before tear gas rained down on them.

On Wednesday night, demonstrators were back on the streets. “Open the borders,” they chanted.


Though there have been regular protests in Amman, Jordan, throughout the nearly six-month war, the government has largely managed to contain the situation by aligning itself with public sentiment — harshly criticizing Israel’s conduct of the war and championing the Palestinian cause. But the scenes this week appeared more spontaneous, the crowds larger and the anger more raw, sending shock waves through the country’s powerful security establishment.

“Jordan is in an unenviable position,” said Saud al-Sharafat, a former Brig. Gen. in the Jordanian General Intelligence Directorate and founder of the Sharafat ِCenter for the Study of Globalization and Terrorism. The grinding conflict in Gaza, and the soaring Palestinian   death toll , are testing the state’s “ability to maintain the tempo that exists now, so that [things] do not get out of control.”


The Kingdom of Jordan occupies a unique position in the Middle East. It is a close and longtime ally of the United States, receiving more than $1 billion annually in economic and military   aid . In 1994, Jordan signed a   peace treaty   with neighboring Israel. But the mass displacement of Palestinians during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war — known to Arabs as the   “nakba,”   or catastrophe — forever altered the country’s demographics.

Jordan is home to more than 2 million Palestinian refugees, most of whom have Jordanian citizenship. Analysts   estimate   half of the population is of Palestinian descent. For many here, geographically and emotionally, the war in Gaza feels very close.

Jordanian authorities — who typically show little tolerance for public demonstrations — have sanctioned weekly protests after Friday prayers.

“It seems, over time, government institutions learned their lessons and started giving space [for people] to relieve tension,” said Sharafat.

LINK TO SEEDED ARTICLE; https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/jordan-s-government-struggles-to-contain-unrest-as-gaza-protests-grow/ar-BB1kH3CW?ocid=hpmsn&cvid=3f1127f1bbc84aefa4b6b1080306bd7f&ei=43


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Kavika
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Kavika     3 weeks ago

Jordan is an ally of the US and has a peace treaty with Israel plus there are US troops stationed in Jordan. This is a very dangerous situation for Jordan and ultimately for the ME.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
2  Gsquared    3 weeks ago

I had a Jordanian client many years ago, from 2001 until 2003.  She was in the U.S. for a couple of years before returning home.  She told me:  "We have nothing against the Israelis."  The immigration lawyer she was working with to stay in the country until the matter I represented her on was resolved was an Israeli guy.  She was Jordanian, not Palestinian.  That may make a difference.  She was also one of the nicest and smartest people I have ever known.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
2.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Gsquared @2    3 weeks ago

Jordanians are the gems in the Arab world.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
3  Buzz of the Orient    3 weeks ago

I was fortunate to have been able to tour Petra in Jordan.  Our tour guide was wonderful, took our group to his home for refreshments, and was even able to talk the gunmen who stopped our minibus on the road out of murdering us. 

 
 

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