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Lily Gladstone's upset loss to Emma Stone was expected for this reason

  

Category:  Entertainment

Via:  john-russell  •  one month ago  •  17 comments

By:   Leonardo DiCaprio (ArcaMax)

Lily Gladstone's upset loss to Emma Stone was expected for this reason

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Lily Gladstone's upset loss to Emma Stone was expected for this reason


Martha Ross, The Mercury News on Mar 12, 2024

When Emma Stone's name was announced Sunday night as the winner of best actress at the 96th Academy Awards, she looked genuinely stunned, as many pundits had said that Lily Gladstone was the frontrunner and predicted she would make history as the first Native American woman to win an acting Oscar.

But in the run-up to Sunday's ceremony, some awards watchers were skeptical. They expressed doubt that Gladstone would achieve this historic milestone and not because she didn't give a superb performance in "Killers of the Flower Moon."

They cited the issue of Gladstone's relatively limited screen time in the Martin Scorsese epic crime drama, set in the Osage Nation in the 1920s, and the view that her character, Mollie Burkhart, wasn't really the film's narrative focus.

Gladstone, who has a white mother and whose father is of Blackfeet and Nimiipuu heritage, is on screen for about 56 minutes in a film that's three hours and 26 minutes long, according to Matthew Stewart, a screen timer expert with Gold Derby.

With that 27% screen time, some critics have argued that the film is more interested in the character played by Leonardo DiCaprio, who is on screen for 1 hour and 49 minutes. Gladstone's limited screen time also sparked debate months ago over whether her role was supporting and she should have campaigned in the supporting actress category.

On the Hollywood industry podcast "The Town" Thursday, host Matthew Belloni and guest Michael Lasker, a talent manager and Oscars expert, agreed that Gladstone had a supporting role. Mollie is an Osage woman whose relatives are systematically being murdered by her husband, played by DiCaprio, and his uncle, played by Robert De Niro, in a bid to seize her family's oil-rich Oklahoma land.

Belloni and Lasker compared the Mollie character to Stone's Bella Baxter, whose story is definitely at the center of "Poor Things," making it more of a traditional leading role.

"I am on record as saying that Emma Stone is going to win," Belloni said. "It's a flashier performance." In Yorgos Lanthimos' costume drama, Stone plays a woman who goes on a journey of self-discovery after being brought back to life by an eccentric surgeon. She's on screen for one hour and 37 minutes, or 69% of "Poor Things" running time.

"I think ultimately voters watch the movies, evaluate the performances and select based on what they think is the best performance," Belloni continued. "There are other factors that come into it. The representation issue, I think, is a big one. (Gladstone) would be the first Native American actress to win in this category. It would be a great moment on stage at the Oscars, and I do think that comes into a little bit."

Lasker agreed that it would have been a great Oscars moment for Gladstone to win and to give a moving speech on the historic nature of the honor. He also said she was "amazing" in "Killers of the Flower Moon," though he, too, noted that she's only in the movie for about 50 minutes.

"It occurred to me: If they had run Lily in supporting, she probably would have run in a landslide," Lasker said.

Maybe Gladstone would have won in the supporting category, but she would have had stiff competition: Over the course of the 2023 awards season, Da'Vine Joy Randolph was the overwhelming favorite to win that trophy for her performance in "The Holdovers."

Some people online wondered if the increasingly international makeup of the Academy's membership could have favored an Emma Stone win. Others expressed concerns that Gladstone's loss was due to racism and Hollywood's unwillingness to rectify its "ugly history" of marginalizing and misrepresenting Indigenous people.

For many others, the results of the race revived debate about the narrative intentions of "Killers of the Flower Moon." As Scorsese and Gladstone promoted "Killers of the Flower Moon," they, as well as Gladstone fans and some film critics, insisted that her Mollie character was "the moral center" of the film's narrative.

"If Mollie is the movie's conscience, Gladstone is its center of gravity: Even when she shares scenes with A-listers like DiCaprio and De Niro, the film bends to her," New York Times writer Kyle Buchanan wrote in a profile of Gladstone.

A Goldstone fan also posted on X Sunday night: "lily gladstone was the heart and soul of KotFM. the sheer intensity she commanded was astounding. every look, scream, tear, word that came out of her, i felt it in my bones. a performance for the ages in a film that has cemented its place in film history."

Certainly, Scorsese tried to deflect criticism that he had created another film that focuses on a group of White male antiheroes or on a White male savior. The legendary director explained in interviews that an early version of the screenplay focused on federal agent Tom White, who led the investigation into the Osage murders. DiCaprio originally was cast in the Tom White role. Scorsese and co-writer Eric Roth adapted the script from the book by David Grann, but the script wasn't working.

"After a certain point, I realized I was making a movie about all the white guys," Scorsese told Time. "Meaning I was taking the approach from the outside in, which concerned me."

The script was retooled to examine Mollie and Ernest's fraught marriage and how racism fuels hatred and greed, NPR reported.

But some said that Scorsese didn't go far enough in prioritizing Mollie's perspective, according to NPR. Upon seeing the film at its Los Angeles premiere, Christopher Cote, one of the Osage language instructors brought on to coach the cast, expressed disappointment to The Hollywood Reporter that Mollie wasn't really at the center of the movie, while acknowledging that its overarching theme is complicity in white supremacy.

Cote said: "Martin Scorsese not being Osage, I think he did a great job representing our people, but this story is being told almost from the perspective of Ernest Burkhart."

On Sunday night, the Times' Buchanan defended the choice for Gladstone to campaign in the leading actress category. "There's more to a film career than winning an Oscar," he wrote on X. "By going lead, Lily told Hollywood to treat her like a lead. And she just booked another lead, which many supporting winners struggle to do." But someone responding to Buchanan's post argued that it would have been "bad optics" for Gladstone to be considered a supporting actor in a story about the Osage Nation while DiCaprio was pushed as a lead actor."

Gladstone's supporters could argue that she had as much right to campaign for a leading acting Oscar as Anthony Hopkins did in 1991, when he won best actor for his 16 minutes of screen time as Hannibal Lecter in "The Silence of the Lambs." Meanwhile, as her fans expressed disappointment that she didn't win the Oscar, they said her nomination itself was historic. As the Washington Post reported, Gladstone's season was "trailblazing," with her racking up Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards. She also received a standing ovation when she won the SAG award last month.

Some cultural commentators also spoke of the "Lily Gladstone effect," how her high profile this awards season, standing at podiums to accept multiple honors, would help lift up other Native talent in the industry, the Christian Science Monitor reported.

"Lily Gladstone not winning does not take away from the fact that she gave one of the best performances of the year," said Variety editor Jazz Tangcay on X. "Her performance and the film will live on long after tonight is over. Her wins have been historic and trailblazing. She already made history."

©#YR@ MediaNews Group, Inc. Visit at mercurynews.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one month ago
I doubt if I will take the time to do it, but if I did I think I could find quite a few best actress winners that weren't on the screen longer than 56 minutes in their winning movie.
 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
1.1  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago

It’s not the minutes, it’s the percentage of the story in a very long movie. According to this article, she was onscreen for 27% of the movie. That’s not very much.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Tacos! @1.1    one month ago
it’s the percentage of the story in a very long movie.

why? its still a 56 minute performance no matter how long the movie is.  56 minutes is a lead performance. 

supporting performances are in the 20 minute to half hour range

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
1.1.2  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    one month ago
why?

Like I said: 27% of the movie. Don’t get mad at me - I didn’t invent the category of supporting actor.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.3  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Tacos! @1.1.2    one month ago

I'm not mad at anybody i just think you're wrong

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
1.1.4  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.3    one month ago

I’m not wrong. I’m telling you what the seed says. I don’t even have an opinion about who should have won because I didn’t see either movie. It is a fact, though, that actors, their supporters, agents, and publicists choose to influence academy members to consider them for a certain category. Who knows? If her people had pushed for supporting actor, Gladstone might have won. Or maybe it was just a legitimately close question.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2  seeder  JohnRussell    one month ago
I doubt if I will take the time to do it, but if I did I think I could find quite a few best actress winners that weren't on the screen longer than 56 minutes in their winning movie.
 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3  Sparty On    one month ago

You are tilting at windmills John.    She didn’t lose because of her heritage.    She lost because the Oscars is largely a mutual admiration society.

Always has been …..

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4  Perrie Halpern R.A.    one month ago

I think this whole article is nuts. We are now counting how many minutes people were on screen? It should be whether on the quality of the performance and if the character played a pivotal role, of which she did. At least the BAFTA got it right.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
4.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4    one month ago

56 minutes is well within the amount of time to qualify for lead actress in my opinion

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
4.1.1  Snuffy  replied to  JohnRussell @4.1    one month ago
in my opinion

That's just it. The entirety of such awards are all in the opinions of those who are "judges" for the entity. 

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
5  Tacos!    one month ago

Seems like maybe she should have been nominated for supporting actor.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6  evilone    one month ago

Why do people care about these award shows? Seems like a colossal waste...

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  evilone @6    one month ago
Why do people care about

you could apply that question to a lot of things people do

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.1.1  evilone  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    one month ago
you could apply that question to a lot of things people do

True, but I wasn't asking a rhetorical question.  I do find it interesting that no one has answered yet.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
7  Kavika     one month ago

Seems like maybe she should have been nominated for supporting actor.

She was on screen for 56 minutes of critical time in the movie which I believe is more than enough to be nominated for best actress. I think perhaps just concentrating on Lily is doing both she and the movie a disservice. It was nominated for ten awards and received none I find that unusual. Martin Scorsese, Robert DeNiro, Lily, Best Picture, Robbie Robertson's best musical score and the best original song by , Scott Walker, ''Song of My People'' also the other nominations were stunningly done. Perhaps as a Indian, I look more closely at the customs, mannerisms, culture, language and other things that make a movie authentic and this was done to perfection in all forms. Lily and others speaking the Osage language not and blah blah blah but with understanding the emotion of the Osage language, the language instructor made them do it over and over and over till you could not tell is wasn't an Osage speaker. They even studied and learned how Osage women walked, carried themselves, and all the mannerisms of the Osage women from the time. 

I've been a Martin Scorsese Robbie Robertson fan since 1978 when they filmed the ''Last Waltz'' and became friends and worked together on many movies yet never won an Oscar. I was hoping this year, since Robbie walked on some months ago that this would be the time for Robbie and for Martin. 

The Last Waltz was the best concert I've ever been to and Robbie is one of the most talented people that I ever met. Of course, Martin is one of a kind.

I'll add that Robert DeNiro and Leanardo DiCaprio were outstanding in their roles as usual.

Just the opinion of a Native American who is extremely proud of Lily and the whole team, if you're going to do a sweeping epic of a part of American history do it right and as authentic as possible, and that they did.

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
7.1  Snuffy  replied to  Kavika @7    one month ago
Seems like maybe she should have been nominated for supporting actor.

Agreed. Had she been nominated for supporting actress she probably would have won. Found this tidbit ..

The Academy makes no distinction between what constitutes a lead or supporting role, neither in length of time on screen nor in a narrative sense. They tend to leave it up to the performers themselves (or, more likely, their film’s studios) with regards to the campaigning for consideration. 

Oscar Discussion: How Do We Tell Supporting Performances from Leading? Should It Be Based on Time On Screen? | Fandango

 
 

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