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Teens, with mixed feelings about their own phones, say their parents need to log off

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  one month ago  •  2 comments

By:   Angela Yang

Teens, with mixed feelings about their own phones, say their parents need to log off
Nearly three-quarters of teens surveyed by the Pew Research Center said they feel happy or peaceful when they don't have their smartphones — but 44% also said they feel anxious without them.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


How do teens feel without their smartphones? Better, for the most part.

Nearly three-quarters of teens surveyed by the Pew Research Center said they feel happy or peaceful when they don't have their smartphones — but 44% also said they feel anxious without them.

The teens were asked a series of questions about how being without smartphones made them feel, resulting in some slightly contradictory answers. Casting some shadow on that happiness, 40% of teens said they often or sometimes felt upset and another 39% said they felt lonely without a smartphone.

The prevalence of these feelings also varied by gender, as 45% of teen girls reported feeling lonely without their phones compared to 34% of teen boys.

The research, published Monday, found that teens also have a bone to pick with their parents' screen time habits. Only 31% of parents diagnosed themselves as being sometimes or often distracted by their own phones while having conversations with their teen, whereas 46% of teens reported this behavior occurring.

"One thing that's important to note is that screen time isn't just a teen issue. It's a family issue," said Colleen McClain, a Pew research associate and lead researcher for the survey. "We really wanted to highlight the way that teens and parents are navigating these issues. I think the design of our study, where we've been able to talk to both teens and their parents, really helps us to explore the nuances of all of this."

Carried out over the course of a month last year, the study was conducted via a web survey completed by around 1,450 parent-and-teen pairs. McClain said researchers did not study the reasoning or implications behind their answers, but more so aimed to unveil a picture of how vital a role smartphones play in families with teens.

The survey adds to a growing body of research seeking to understand the impact of smartphones on young people and family dynamics.

"This is at the center of the national conversation right now and we're really thrilled to have this opportunity to survey both parents and their teens to understand their experiences, really elevate their voices and bring them to the center of this really, really important conversation," she said.

A majority of teens surveyed said they believe the benefits of phone use generally outweigh the harms. In an increasingly digitized world, about two-thirds said smartphones make it easier for young people to pursue their interests and hobbies, as well as to be creative. Nearly half also said the devices enable them to perform better in school.

They were more skeptical, however, about their smartphone's impact on their overall social life. Less than 40% of teens said phones help them develop healthy friendships, although this makes up a plurality. Those who believed the opposite made up an even split with those who were neutral on this topic.

And less than one-third believed these digital devices could help them develop better social skills, with more than 40% saying they make doing so harder.

In surveying parents as well, Pew found that half of all parents have looked through their teen's phone at least once — but not always with their child's knowledge: Only 43% of teens paired with those parents say they believe this has happened. Families also reported more parental snooping on younger teens' devices as compared to older teens.

Parents and teens do report being equally aware of how likely they are to argue about phone use. Nearly 40% of both parents and teens say that the amount of screen time the child consumes leads to arguments at least sometimes, if not often.


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Jeremy Retired in NC
Professor Expert
1  Jeremy Retired in NC    one month ago
Nearly three-quarters of teens surveyed by the Pew Research Center said they feel happy or peaceful when they don't have their smartphones — but 44% also said they feel anxious without them.

So let me get this straight...  75% feel happy or peaceful.  

                                              44% feel anxious.

The math isn't mathing!

 
 
 
goose is back
Sophomore Guide
1.1  goose is back  replied to  Jeremy Retired in NC @1    one month ago

and 19% don't know how to calculate percentages. 

 
 

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