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Sweden looks into the abyss

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  krishna  •  one month ago  •  17 comments

By:   STEFAN HEDLUND

Sweden looks into the abyss
The Scandinavian nation of 10.6 million people is facing a national crisis because of its failure to successfully integrate record numbers of immigrants.

Photo credit: The Swedish royal flag above the Royal Palace in Stockholm on June 11, 2023. © Getty Images


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


In a nutshell

    • Sweden’s reputation has fallen from welfare-state model to warning example
    • Foreign-born citizens now account for 20 percent of the nation’s population
    • Officials are perplexed by crime, economic threats, deteriorating education

After staying out of World War II, Sweden had evolved into a high-performing export-oriented economy, based on a stable parliamentary democracy and social consensus. The country had top-notch health care and education. It enjoyed social and gender equality, had low crime rates and little ethnic conflict. 

Present-day Sweden carries the dubious distinction of having the highest rate of gangland killings in Europe. It boasts the lowest average age of serious offenders, with children in their low teens being arrested for murder.

Increasing segments of suburbs are officially classified as “especially vulnerable areas,” where it is “hard, bordering on impossible” for the police to operate. In layman’s terms, these are no-go zones, where local clans rule and where first responders will not enter without flak jackets and police escort.

Sweden has transitioned from being a model of inspiration to becoming a warning example. As gangland violence is spreading across borders, its Scandinavian neighbors experience growing fears of ending up in what is known in Denmark as the “Swedish condition.”

Defying an old taboo, the Swedish government has called on the military to assist the police. It has even come to the point where the governor of the Bank of Sweden, Erik Thedeen, tells the Financial Times that the growing problem of shootings and bombings is so serious that it risks damaging the country’s long-term economic growth.

Given the negative impact that a statement of this kind will have on markets, it is not to be taken lightly. Central bank governors weigh their words very carefully.

Having been long in denial, even the Social Democrats have now released a report of their own, recognizing that two decades of excessive immigration and failed integration have produced a national crisis.

Not All Migrants Are the Same

The reason why the problem has been allowed to get out of control is that so many representatives of the media and of the political establishment have for so long been cocooned in naive views of criminal dangers, leading to extremely lax legislation and enforcement, and of dangerous strains of Islamism, leading to a profound inability to scale up defenses against the current wave of radicalization. Those chickens are now coming home to roost.

Getting Tough On Crime Is Not Enough

An optimistic scenario departs from the fact that the non-socialist coalition government that came to power after the September 2022 election is busy creating legislation to tackle the crisis. In the words of Justice Minister Gunnar Strommer, the ambition is to achieve a “systemic change,” where a long-standing focus on rehabilitating perpetrators is replaced by a clear focus on victims.

The legislative agenda is built on inspiration from Denmark. It features much longer sentences for serious crimes, double penalties for gang members and special prisons for young offenders. It offers new tools for law enforcement, ranging from rights to electronic surveillance of gang members even before crimes are committed, to the introduction of visitation zones where police may stop and search even in the absence of suspicions of violations. And it includes a substantial boost in the creation of prisons to house convicted felons, including plans to rent space abroad.

While the government is strongly committed to realizing this agenda, it may not succeed. Denmark has been so successful because it started before the problems had gotten out of hand. In Sweden, the government has not only started late but also shied away from adopting the Danish example in its entirety.


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Krishna
Professor Expert
1  seeder  Krishna    one month ago

The Scandinavian nation of 10.6 million people is facing a national crisis because of its failure to successfully integrate record numbers of immigrants.

Foreign-born citizens now account for 20 percent of the nation’s population

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2  seeder  Krishna    one month ago

Present-day Sweden carries the dubious distinction of having the highest rate of gangland killings in Europe. It boasts the lowest average age of serious offenders, with children in their low teens being arrested for murder.

Increasing segments of suburbs are officially classified as “especially vulnerable areas,” where it is “hard, bordering on impossible” for the police to operate. In layman’s terms, these are no-go zones, where local clans rule and where first responders will not enter without flak jackets and police escort.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
3  seeder  Krishna    one month ago

Not All Migrants Are the Same

The reason why the problem has been allowed to get out of control is that so many representatives of the media and of the political establishment have for so long been cocooned in naive views of criminal dangers, leading to extremely lax legislation and enforcement,and of dangerous strains of Islamism, leading to a profound inability to scale up defenses against the current wave of radicalization. Those chickens are now coming home to roost.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4  Drinker of the Wry    one month ago

Sweden has some of strict gun laws yet second highest gun crime death rate per capita in Europe.

How can both be true, effective smuggling.  Serbian pistols, and Yugoslav-era hand grenades are the most common killing devices there.  The so-called “Yugoslav mafia” that dominated Stockholm’s criminal underworld several decades ago established the supply process.  The are now getting weapons from the Ukraine.  Without any border control, the smuggling is easy and profitable.  The gangs need the weapons to maintain or take control  of Sweden's drugs, illegal gambling, and sex markets.  

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4    one month ago
Without any border control, the smuggling is easy and profitable. 

Why doesn't Sweden have adequate border control?

Ot perhaps a better way to phrase the Q: why do so many other European countries have better border control?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
5  Greg Jones    one month ago

And not learning a damn thing from what is happening in Sweden and the rest of Europe, Biden continues to welcome these "newcomers".

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5.1  Kavika   replied to  Greg Jones @5    one month ago

Which newcomers are you talking about Greg, they have a very diverse immigrant population.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
5.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Kavika @5.1    one month ago

Haven't you heard, Kavika, this is Biden's new term of endearment for illegal aliens.

Biden Admin's New Term for Migrants Sparks Republican Fury (msn.com)

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5.1.2  Kavika   replied to  Greg Jones @5.1.1    one month ago

So it's all migrants, good to know but it seems that in Sweden there is a very diverse group, Syrians, Roma's, Germans, Serbians etc and the the ones that are most organized as in organized crime are the Serbians/Montenagrens. 

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Principal
6  Sean Treacy    one month ago

Mass migration  without assimilation is a recipe for disaster. This is an Australian 60 minutes report about their "no go" zones from a few years ago. It did not go well for the reporters

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
6.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Sean Treacy @6    one month ago
Mass migration  without assimilation is a recipe for disaster. This is an Australian 60 minutes report about their "no go" zones from a few years ago. It did not go well for the reporters

Many of the Swedes are starting to become aware of the consequences of their policies. But it may be too late . . .

(Interestingly the Danes were starting to have similar problems-- but apparently they realized the dangers much earlier than the Swedes and took measure to correct it)

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
7  Greg Jones    one month ago

Others saw it coming years ago.  This is an interesting read.

While Europe Slept - Wikipedia

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
7.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Greg Jones @7    one month ago

Others saw it coming years ago.  This is an interesting read.

While Europe Slept - Wikipedia

From the reviews (Wikipedia):

In an article published in   The Wall Street Journal ,   Walter Laqueur   writes that " While Europe Slept   is an angry book, well written and well informed. And it could not, of course, be more timely." [8]  

J. Peder Zane of the   National Book Critics Circle   wrote that the book offers "urgent prose that challenges widely held ideas" in addition to "provocative—and controversial—arguments".

Zane thinks the book "begs innumerable qualifications" when it bluntly states that "European Muslims are hostile to 'pluralism, tolerance, democracy and sexual equality'", but believes that Bawer addresses those qualifications.

Zane suggests that Bawer, who is openly gay, is concerned about what could happen to European gay communities if Islamists succeed in establishing   Sharia   law that is hostile to homosexuals. [3]

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
9  Buzz of the Orient    one month ago

Well, as for the wonderful modern peaceful neutral people of Sweden, they've been pretty busy being anti-Semites, and not just recently

Anti-Semitic hate crimes in Sweden rise by 53% to all-time high

LINK ->

ANTI-SEMITISM IN SWEDEN

LINK ->

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
9.1  charger 383  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @9    one month ago

Do you think it comes from people who have been there for generations or new ones who came from other places?

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
9.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  charger 383 @9.1    one month ago

It started generations ago, but increased greatly with the influx of immigrants:

Antisemitism isn’t a new phenomenon in Sweden. In fact, it was there even before the first Jewish communities were founded in Stockholm and Marstrand near Gothenburg in the late 18 th  century. Towards the end of the 19 th  century and the beginning of the 20 th , official state restrictions and discrimination slowly disappeared, but antisemitic ideology and propaganda could be found throughout both the old political establishment and newly founded neo-Nazi and fascist movements. Surprisingly, the end of WW2, which left neutral Sweden relatively unharmed, wasn’t the end of Swedish Nazism. Quite the opposite. After the war Sweden became host for many racist, nationalist and fascist movements. While the political elite was gradually embracing universal values and continuing to develop a social-democratic welfare state, the extreme right on the margins of Swedish society was, and some say still is, flourishing. Neo-Nazi skinheads, antisemitic publishing houses and movements based on pre-Christian imagery that promote nationalist, racist and anti-establishment ideas became an integrate part of Swedish society.

Malmö played an interesting role in this story during the final stages of WW2 and the following years. On one hand, this was the city that became a safe haven for Danish Jews who arrived at its shores after crossing the Öresund strait fleeing the Nazis in 1943. This is also where the Swedish Red Cross’ “White Buses” arrived in 1945, carrying survivors of the Nazi concentration camps. On the other hand, this was the home of the so-called Malmö Movement, which played a central role in the rehabilitation of Europe’s extreme right, back in the 1950’s. The movement’s leader Per Engdahl took a leading role in the project of connecting the remnants of fascist and Nazi movements from all over Europe and forming a political network which published literature, organized conferences and created an escape route for Nazis from Europe to South America. The center of all this was Malmö were Engdahl lived and worked. But all this is ancient history…

For over ten years now, Malmö has become, in the eyes of many, a symbol of a new kind of Swedish antisemitism. While right wing extremism is still dangerous and threatens Jews in Malmö just like anywhere else, in the last few years an imported antisemitism originating in the Middle East and Islamist environments has taken over. In Sweden, the combination of the two proved itself particularly worrying and Malmö is sometimes seen as the center of it all. In 2012 an explosion shook the Jewish community center. In 2009, Molotov cocktails were thrown at the local Jewish funeral home. In the same year Malmö was the scene of what is now known as the Davis Cup riots. As Israel and Sweden were playing an official tennis match, thousands of anti-Israel demonstrators took to the streets and the protest developed into physical and verbal attacks against the city’s Jews and law enforcement forces. At the time, former mayor IImar Reepalu, was accused of being part of the problem, rather than part of the solution when he said to a local daily that “We accept neither Zionism nor antisemitism which are extremes that put themselves above other groups”. But problems didn’t stop when Reepalu was replaced in 2013. Pro-Palestinian demonstrations, especially during periods of conflict in Gaza, continued to feature heavily antisemitic slogans, signs and rhetoric.

When I visited the city in 2015 in order to write  a report for “Haaretz”  I spoke to a few members of its Jewish Community. Those were the days when hundreds of asylum seekers were arriving every day, mainly from Syria and Afghanistan, crossing the bridge from Copenhagen and arriving at Malmö which became their Swedish port of arrival. As authorities in Sweden were struggling with challenges of housing, employment, education and integration, many in Malmö were worried. “There is fear and harassment on a daily bases”, one woman who immigrated from Israel to Malmö decades ago told me. She claimed that authorities were doing nothing against the daily harassment and the incitement from local mosques. “I’m not against accepting asylum seekers”, another community member told me, “one should not close the door to people in need of help, but this is what happens when we want to solve one problem by creating a bigger one. We need to use our heads, not only our hearts”. After this, I returned to the city on several occasions and reports continued to be troubling. Some claimed that Jewish families were leaving the city because they no longer felt safe. In 2021, a report commissioned by the municipality described Malmö schools as an unsafe environment for Jewish students who suffer from verbal and physical attacks while teachers prefer to avoid conflict with the aggressors. Other reports claimed that Holocaust survivors are no longer invited to tell their stories in certain schools in Malmö because Muslim students treat them disrespectfully.

LINK ->

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
9.1.2  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @9.1.1    one month ago
“There is fear and harassment on a daily bases”, one woman who immigrated from Israel to Malmö decades ago told me.

I remember reading, some time ago, that the problem was particularly severe in Malmo.

 
 

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