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Suburbia is Subsidized: Here's the Math

  

Category:  Mental Health and Wellness

Via:  outis  •  4 months ago  •  10 comments

By:   Jason Slaughter

Suburbia is Subsidized: Here's the Math



Car-dependent suburbia is subsidized by productive urban places.
That's why American cities are broke.
But how bad is it, and who is subsidizing whom?



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A few days ago, I mentioned that suburbia was a financial disaster for the towns and counties concerned. Here's the first video I came across on the subject.

I was expecting some skeptical reaction here on NT. I got none. My conclusion is that almost no one watched that video...  jrSmiley_19_smiley_image.gif


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



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Outis
Freshman Principal
1  seeder  Outis    4 months ago

I've sent several articles to local Zoning & Planning. I'm not optimistic.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
1.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Outis @1    4 months ago

I don’t understand.  I live in the Wash DC metro area.  DC taxes and expenses have nothing to do with the VA and MD suburbs taxes and expenses.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     4 months ago

The video and the conclusion/facts are just amazing.

From my experience city councils and planning boards are made up of developers. In our city the entire city council is developers and none are interested in mixed-use neighborhoods.

 
 
 
Outis
Freshman Principal
2.1  seeder  Outis  replied to  Kavika @2    4 months ago

All the urbanist channels I've seen say the same thing: this is a "citizen" topic. Either people get involved or the beat goes on.

 
 
 
mocowgirl
Professor Quiet
3  mocowgirl    4 months ago

How does population density affect people's mental and physical health?

 
 
 
GregTx
Professor Guide
3.1  GregTx  replied to  mocowgirl @3    4 months ago

Obviously it depends on the individual but in my opinion is it would be a net negative. But I'm a rural citizen so I'm sure there's bias in my opinion. 

 
 
 
mocowgirl
Professor Quiet
3.1.1  mocowgirl  replied to  GregTx @3.1    4 months ago
Obviously it depends on the individual but in my opinion is it would be a net negative. But I'm a rural citizen so I'm sure there's bias in my opinion.

Totally agree.

However, if the population continues to grow, it is either stack 'em deep in the cities or eliminate farming in the US due to urban sprawl.

People, who don't farm, do not seem to have any understanding of how much acreage it takes to grow crops and cattle. 

 
 
 
GregTx
Professor Guide
3.1.2  GregTx  replied to  mocowgirl @3.1.1    4 months ago
However, if the population continues to grow, it is either stack 'em deep in the cities or eliminate farming in the US due to urban sprawl.

I don't see it as an either/or situation. While some cities might see population decrease others see increase. Meanwhile small family farms are turned into subdivisions, where those that want to get away from the city can live in a house ten feet away from their neighbors?....

People, who don't farm, seem to have no understanding of how much acreage it takes to grow crops and cattle.

Nor the change in behavior of critters when you overcrowd a pen or feed lot.

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
3.2  charger 383  replied to  mocowgirl @3    4 months ago

My opinion is it is bad for people's mental and physical health.  Causes stress, noise, less open spaces, worry about safety, lack of privacy, Less safe places to play and exercise, some places are run down and depressing,  ect ect 

 
 
 
mocowgirl
Professor Quiet
3.2.1  mocowgirl  replied to  charger 383 @3.2    4 months ago
My opinion is it is bad for people's mental and physical health.  Causes stress, noise, less open spaces, worry about safety, lack of privacy, Less safe places to play and exercise, some places are run down and depressing,  ect ect 

I agree.  Whenever I was forced to live in a city or sub-division, I considered it Hell on Earth.  

 
 

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