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Politics and Local Laws are Influencing Where People Relocating

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  robert-in-ohio  •  3 weeks ago  •  20 comments

By:   Andrew Dorn

Politics and Local Laws are Influencing Where People Relocating
"Why are these red states growing so rapidly? The short answer is that they are more pro-business.", Mark Perry AEI

Large numbes of people and businesses are moving their homes and headquarters respectively out "blue" states and into "red" states for a variety of reasons.

What are those reasons?

No state taxes?

Right to Work Laws?

Corporate tax benefits?

Local and State laws?


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


A record share of   homebuyers relocated  to a different metro area in 2023, and a new survey suggests politics may be one of the big reasons why.

One-third of real estate agents said they have worked with a client over the past year who decided to move “primarily because of state or local laws or politics,”   according to real estate brokerage Redfin .

“State laws differ on partisan issues like abortion and gun control, with many Americans reporting they would prefer to live in a place with laws that align with their own views,” Redfin said in the report. “On a similar note, many Americans prefer living in a place where their neighbors have similar political views.”

The pandemic-driven rise in remote work has given Americans   more flexibility   to move, and many are taking the opportunity to find like-minded communities.

Last year, some of the most common migration routes were from blue states to red or purple states. That shift was largely due to housing affordability but also because some homebuyers wanted to live in a more conservative place, Redfin noted.

Redfin agents say they have noticed more people relocating for political reasons since the pandemic.


Red Box Rules

Discussing the issue, the whole issue and nothing but the issue presented in the article will be greatly appreciated.

Be vocal, be adamant and steady in your views but also be civil in the presentation of your position.


 

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Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
1  seeder  Robert in Ohio    3 weeks ago

People are flooding from states for many reasons - some political, some financial and some ????

From the article - 

“I know at least 10 people who have moved away from Texas in the last year, mainly because they don’t agree with state laws,” Andrew Vallejo, an Austin, Texas, Redfin premier agent, said in the report. “They all moved to the West Coast, to blue places where the policies align better with their personal views, specifically when it comes to women’s reproductive rights and LGBTQ rights.” 

Another couple, who moved from Los Angeles to Boise, Idaho, were  excited to hang an American flag  and a Thin Blue Line banner at their new home after feeling uncomfortable putting them up in California.

Others are moving to red states due to pro-business policies, like lower taxes and fewer restrictions on companies, Redfin said, based on what the brokerage had heard from agents.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  Robert in Ohio @1    3 weeks ago

Bob, is the migration equal? 

Are the same number of people going to Red states as are those going to blue states?

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
1.1.1  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1    3 weeks ago

Vic

I am not totally sure from this article, but other articles I have read lead me to believe it might be larger to Red states (Florida, Texas and others w/o income tax) than to Blue states, but that is only my opinion at this point.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Robert in Ohio @1.1.1    3 weeks ago

They may also be migrating because of the cost of living.

I don't share the same views as my neighbors but I'm not leaving because I have a comfortable life in a deep red state

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  Robert in Ohio @1.1.1    3 weeks ago

Many red states have much lower taxes than blue states.

Thankfully!

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
1.1.4  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.2    3 weeks ago

Trout Giggles

I think that is a great point and the cost of living in smaller, rural states north and south is certainly inviting to someone trying to get out from under the staggering costs of living in a lot less appealing housing and seeing their salaries go farther.

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
1.1.5  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.3    3 weeks ago

Texan

I know some red states have no state income tax and that is certainly a draw to many people and it it is not hard to believe that taxes in California and New York are higher than most anywhere else one would move.

That is why the left squealed so hard when SALT (state and local taxes) were no longer deductible from federal income tax.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.6  Texan1211  replied to  Robert in Ohio @1.1.5    3 weeks ago

I always got a kick about that squealing after being preached to about how the rich don't pay their fair share.

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
1.1.7  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.6    3 weeks ago

I was right there with you

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
2  seeder  Robert in Ohio    3 weeks ago

And from the NY Times

The places they are flocking to have lower taxes. The 10 states that saw the biggest population gains have an average maximum income tax of 3.8 percent. The 10 states with the biggest population loss have an 8 percent average rate.

There are a lot of us in the Northeastern media who properly spend a lot of time slamming the Republican Party for what a mess it’s become. I have only one question: If we’re right, why are so many people leaving blue states so they can live in red ones?

Between 2010 and 2020, the fastest-growing states   were mostly red   — places like Texas, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee and South Carolina.

Opinion | Why People Are Fleeing Blue Cities for Red States - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Principal
3  Sean Treacy    3 weeks ago

The beauty of federalism. For decades, calfifornia played the role of the land of opportunity where internal migrants flooded but disastrous state politics have flipped the equation. Now the south, which 100 years ago saw the great migration, is  hosting reverse migration as people flock to their states seeking opportunity.  The rust belt and northeast will have to adapt or continue to wither away. 

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
3.1  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Sean Treacy @3    3 weeks ago

A possibility, but the "rust belt" is evolving to more high tech manufacturing, an increase in agriculture and other industries that will endure and grow in the coming years.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4  Drinker of the Wry    3 weeks ago

From the 1920's until the 1960's, approximately six million Black people moved from the South to Northern, Midwestern, and Western states.  This movement for jobs and away from Jim Crow South is known as the Great Migration.

Now a Reverse Migration is underway.  Some of the best opportunities for Blacks are now in the South. In the past few decades, many good jobs have moved South and blacks, like many whites and Hispanics, have followed.

All of the top 10 metro areas for job growth are in the South, led in a tie for the No.1 spot by Washington, DC and Atlanta.  Following the 1st place tie, is Austin, Baltimore and Raleigh,  with the rest of the top 20 rounded out exclusively by Southern cities, except for Boston in 19th place.

Key determinants include homeownership, self-employment, improved education, less segregation and structural racism.

The pace of this revers migration seems to be accelerating as Blacks leave  NYC, LA, SF, Chicago, St. Louis., Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee.  Red is the new black.

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
4.1  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4    3 weeks ago

DotW

This issue is across ethnic groups and income classes and is not a black / white issue.

In many cases it is pure economics - lower taxes and better labor law situations from the point of view of the businesses and lower taxes, school preferences and housing opportunities for many people of all age, ethnic and social groups.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Robert in Ohio @4.1    3 weeks ago

Red states are on the side of business when it comes to labor laws

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
4.1.2  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Trout Giggles @4.1.1    3 weeks ago

A widely held belief of many citizens and voters, but just as many on the left would say that those laws are at times anti-worker

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
4.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  Trout Giggles @4.1.1    3 weeks ago

Red states follow federal labor laws like blue ones do.

That may change because some blue states are considering letting people with no permission to work start.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
5  Drinker of the Wry    3 weeks ago

Of course.  I was just pointing out the irony of a Black reverse migration.

 
 
 
Robert in Ohio
Professor Guide
5.1  seeder  Robert in Ohio  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @5    3 weeks ago

The reverse migration is a real thing in multiple ways - people are fleeing the cities for suburbs, little towns and country living with the same gusto they fled the farms for cities way back when

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
5.1.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Robert in Ohio @5.1    3 weeks ago

Agree.

 
 

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