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Boeing’s Tragedy: Inside the Fall of An American Manufacturing Icon

  

Category:  News & Politics

By:  kavika  •  one month ago  •  14 comments

Boeing’s Tragedy: Inside the Fall of An American Manufacturing Icon

An  Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 9  lost a fuselage cabin panel at 16,000 feet and was forced to conduct an emergency landing on Jan. 5, fortunately without any major injuries to passengers and crew.

Still under investigation, it seems that the panel in question (provided by a Boeing partner, Spirit AeroSystems) had not been properly bolted to the fuselage, a major manufacturing defect and quality-control oversight.  Loose parts  were soon found on other 737 MAX 9 planes. The result was  the grounding of all 171 Boeing MAX 9 jets by U.S. regulators and a more than 10% drop in the company’s share price.  


To compound Boeing’s woes, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s Boeing 737  was grounded  in Davos following mechanical failure. And just a few days ago, Boeing was again in the spotlight when a Boeing 747 cargo plane had to perform an  emergency landing  in Miami after an engine caught fire.

These are just the latest in a string of incidents, including  two deadly crashes involving Boeing 737 MAX planes , which have all served to  undermine public confidence  in the company.

Other new Boeing airplanes, such as the  Boeing 787 long-haul Dreamliner , faced development hold-ups, delayed regulatory approval and serious teething troubles (such as its batteries  catching fire ). Even the famous Boeing 777 suffered temporary groundings due to safety concerns, and development of the latest version is running four years behind schedule.

The  industry-leading company  has stumbled from crisis to crisis. But how did it get to this point? Our research on  global innovation  and the  failings of corporate governance suggests that the combination of two major strategy shifts in the early 2000s likely compromised the company's future.   

LINK TO SEEDED ARTICLE:  https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/boeing-s-tragedy-inside-the-fall-of-an-american-manufacturing-icon/ar-BB1hlwZj?ocid=hpmsn&cvid=203040ce80ba43249d1190e398ac6b2c&ei=85







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Kavika
Professor Principal
1  author  Kavika     one month ago

Excellent article explaining the internal problem (s) that are bringing Boeing down.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.1  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

pretty soon the airlines will be restricting carry on bags and begin issuing parachutes to departing passengers ...

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.1  author  Kavika   replied to  devangelical @1.1    one month ago

Boeing has a huge hole to dig it self out of.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.1.2  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @1.1.1    one month ago

a 747 size hole...

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
2  Nerm_L    one month ago

Look for the union label.  Boeing management ain't installing doors.  Union labor is doing the work -- or not.  Depends upon the latest labor contract.

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
2.1  afrayedknot  replied to  Nerm_L @2    one month ago

“Boeing management ain't installing doors.”

But Boeing management is ultimately responsible.

And that is the bottom line…and when it hits their bottom line, as it most certainly will, perhaps then they will reconsider the consequences of their mismanagement. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2.2  author  Kavika   replied to  Nerm_L @2    one month ago

Seems that if you did read the article you didn't understand it or your being willfully ignorant.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
3  Greg Jones    one month ago

Once again, Boeing is not responsible for the failure of components they did not design, manufacture, or are able to service.... specifically, the engine on the 747. For all the rest of the problems, inept management trying to push finished product out the door as quick as possible and trying to cut corners is fully responsible. Perhaps the ulimate blame should be on the FAA, for not keeping closer oversight on what Boeing is doing.

A good analysis is what needs to be done is provided by Juan Browne...military, commercial, and general aviation pilot and A&E mechanic. He posts on several interesting topics, and you can see his frustration with the powers that be in this clip.

(1) Cleared For Takeoff! Boeing 737 Max-9 UPDATE 26 Jan 2024 - YouTube

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1  author  Kavika   replied to  Greg Jones @3    one month ago
Once again, Boeing is not responsible for the failure of components they did not design, manufacture, or are able to service.

Not a chance, Greg. Boeing changed their entire manufacturing system and outsourced a large portion of it and was not able to manage logistics or quality control.

Boeing is responsible 100%.

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
3.1.1  afrayedknot  replied to  Kavika @3.1    one month ago

“Boeing is responsible 100%.”

Imagine the consequences if individual businesses, companies and corporations are not held accountable for the failures, and potentially dangerous ramifications in not providing adequate protections to the public they serve. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
3.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  Kavika @3.1    one month ago

That's like saying Toyota is ultimately responsible if an alternator goes bad.

Sorry, but in the modern world just about every finished product has used multiple vendors of various assemblies, multiple vendors are involved. The GE engine that blew up could just have easily been on some other brand of airplane, like an Airbus.

Not defending Boeing, just pointing out your reasoning is wrong.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1.3  author  Kavika   replied to  Greg Jones @3.1.2    one month ago
Not defending Boeing, just pointing out your reasoning is wrong.

No worries, I believe that the article pointed out how inept Boeing was in controlling quality control of all the vendors they brought on to save costs.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
Professor Quiet
4  Ed-NavDoc    one month ago

Hope the Navy is checking  it's P-8 Poseidon fleet that are based on the 737 Max airframe.

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Participates
4.1  bugsy  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @4    one month ago

I certainly hope so. There are several squadrons here at NAS Jax and I would hate to wake up one morning and learn one of them had a mishap and the possibility of losing a friend.

 
 

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