╌>

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger: Germany Has Made a 'Grave Mistake' with Immigration

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  vic-eldred  •  8 months ago  •  18 comments

By:   Laura Wellington, The Western Journal (The Federalist Papers)

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger: Germany Has Made a 'Grave Mistake' with Immigration
A German-born Jew whose family fled the Nazis, he found the endorsement of Hamas in the streets of Berlin to be "painful."

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Four years ago, while I was visiting my relatives in Munich, Germany, I was floored by the make-up of the inhabitants occupying the city. The majority didn't seem German.

They seemed Muslim. The women were wearing hijabs, burquas, chadors. They moved in units with the Muslim men swarming around them and their children. None spoke German. They spoke a language that sounded Arabic.

During my time observing over several days, I never once saw Muslim men or women engage with German friends or families. No socializing occurred between them. There seemed to be an invisible wall erected between them.

This disturbed me, because that wall was made up of hostility and separateness between the two that couldn't go unnoticed. I wondered how this had happened and who was at fault for the lack of cohesion between the Muslims and Germans.

What disturbed me further was that I hadn't realized just how large the Muslim population had grown in Munich. It seemed that for every two German children walking with their parents, there were six or more Muslim kids doing the same.

I wondered how my German relatives felt about all of this. Their response wasn't flattering when I asked. They blamed the Muslim population for their homeland's current woes.

Mass immigration was plaguing the social security system and straining the economy in Germany. Entitlements given to Muslim families who chose not to assimilate were leaving little left for German families. All their hard work was now being used to care for Muslims who decided to show up and stay, leaving Germans to ask the government, "What about us?"

The German way of life was also being destroyed. Germans were resentful.

They blamed cheap labor and political guilt for the open-door policy instilled in their country. Now feeling very overrun by the number of Muslims living alongside them, the Germans felt displaced in their own country.

Do you agree with Kissinger? Yes No Completing this poll entitles you to our news updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. You're logged in to Facebook. Click here to log out. 100% (44 Votes) 0% (0 Votes)

Sound familiar?

It is no different in the United States today. Not shutting down our open southern border was a huge mistake. The consequences have been and will continue to be dramatic.

Uncontrolled immigration is an error recently voiced by one of the most prominent names of the 20th century: former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

In an interview this week with Axel Springer CEO Mathias Dopfner for Germany's Welt TV, Kissinger described the alarming consequences suffered by countries that rolled out the welcome mat to a wide population of immigrants from varying countries.

The architect of foreign policy during the Vietnam War, Kissinger shared his criticism of immigration as he watched Arabs in Germany applaud Hamas' brutal terrorist attacks on Israel over the weekend.

A German-born Jew whose family fled the Nazis and moved to the United States, Kissinger found the endorsement of Hamas in the streets of Berlin to be revolting.

"I do not have a grievance against the German people," he told Dopfner. "I find celebrations about what happened — which technically was a sort of criminal act — as painful."

"It was a grave mistake to let in so many people of totally different culture and religion and concepts, because it creates a pressure group inside each country that does that," Kissinger said.

The concept of a cohesive "melting pot" sounds great in theory. The application, however, isn't proving itself to be successful anywhere today over the long term. I don't know of any country that is doing it well.

In the beginning, when populations were smaller and the culture ratio was much more agreeable, immigration might have seemed feasible and even advantageous. But the realities and even mishandling of the process resulted in an impossible situation between communities that were adopted into host countries and never stopped coming.

Population explosion and governments making it easy for immigrants "not to assimilate" changed the dynamic of each pro-immigration country altogether.

In the case of the United States, what went from controlled immigration in the beginning is no longer so. The privilege to enter our country has transitioned into "demand" or "forced entry."

To that same end, the leniency "not to assimilate" became the expectation. Thus, Kissinger has a point.

Illegal immigrants have now turned the tables on the process, consistency and face of the United States. They now call the shots. Our insidious government is forcing us, the citizens, to bend to their will.

With the population overwhelmed and reflecting the same complaints of the German people, a national power struggle and total resentment are growing between nationals and legal immigrants.

The issue now, as explained by Kissinger, is that you can't separate paint once it is mixed together. The United States is now a nation of many different cultures that exist as factions, with one, in particular, escalating in numbers to the degree that is causing strife as well as driving anger and fear.

Our melting pot is no longer blending well. In fact, it is inviting enormous danger within our shores.

We now live in a tribalistic, politically polarized national climate, a place where no one feels safe, the economy is collapsing, demographics are changing and emotions run high.

What we are witnessing is the reason Poland shut the door on immigrants without security clearances in 2015. A member of the European Parliament from Poland spoke about the issue in a riveting interview with Tucker Carlson this week. (The discussion begins around the 13:21 mark.)

Ep. 30 What's happening at the southern border isn't just an invasion, but a crime. The politicians and NGOs responsible for it are criminals, who should be punished accordingly. pic.twitter.com/cbkTSUyogC — Tucker Carlson (@TuckerCarlson) October 12, 2023

The conversation shows how right Kissinger is.

It seems logical to cap immigration at the point it begins to destroy the health, welfare and morale of the host country.

Leadership isn't being effective if it refuses to acknowledge reality. In the case of the United States, Germany and other pro-immigration countries, it is time to lock the door and take stock.

By not doing so and merely telling citizens to "suck it up" and "get along" while allowing further uncontrolled immigration, the Biden administration and Democrats have become the people's enemy.

They are inducing a state of emergency and guaranteeing a total breakdown of our society.


Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
[]
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Vic Eldred    8 months ago

It's good to know that by age 100 Kisinger finally realized what a mistake it is to take in people who are of radically different cultures and have no interest in assimilating.

Can we finally end the nonsense that exposing savages to civilization might make them civilized?

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
Professor Principal
1.1  Just Jim NC TttH  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    8 months ago

Please A RESOUNDING YES!!!!

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
1.2  afrayedknot  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    8 months ago

“…exposing savages to civilization…”

May need some clarification of just who are the ‘savages’ and what exactly does ‘civilization’ entail. All I hear is fear. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.2.1  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  afrayedknot @1.2    8 months ago
May need some clarification of just who are the ‘savages’ and what exactly does ‘civilization’ entail.

Not really. Rational people know that genocide and those who either commit it or celebrate it are savages.

It is sad that anyone would be apathetic about it.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Principal
2  Sean Treacy    8 months ago

Immigration without assimilation is suicide,

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
Professor Principal
2.1  Just Jim NC TttH  replied to  Sean Treacy @2    8 months ago

EXACTLY!!

Multiculturalism doesn't work without assimilation.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3  Kavika     8 months ago

In the 1960s and 70s, Germany was desperately short of workers as was most of Europe. In that time period, hundreds of thousands of Turks immigrated to Germany when an agreement was between the countries opened up immigration to form the backbone of their workforce. No matter how long they worked and lived in Germany they were not allowed to become citizens of Germany. There was plenty of racism towards the Turks as well including physical attacks on the Turks. In 2000 laws were changed so that they and others could become German Citizens. Berlin was the first major destination for the Turks and today it has the largest Turkish population in Germany, there are around 7 million Turks in Germany with about half now being citizens. 

One of the really excellent things that came of this is the fusion of Turkish and German food. Stunningly good.

I find it a bit strange that Henry Kissinger would be complaining about this since he has first hand knowledge of how Germans treated Jews, one complaint was they were not assimilating into German society. Today the Nazi party and others are outlawed in Germany yet there are a very large number of them there. 

Germany also faces the problem of a declining population, it is estimated the population of Germany will have dropped from 83 million (2020) to 74 million by 2100. Most of Western Europe faces the same problem.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kavika @3    8 months ago

Politically, Turks in Germany are so important back “home” that Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has campaigned in Germany, setting up offices to maintain a physical footprint. While campaigning in Germany a decade ago, Mr. Erdoğan advised this group to “integrate yourselves into German society but don’t assimilate.” Indeed,  surveys show  Turks abroad are remarkably connected to Turkey politically and culturally.

Turkish Germans in particular are caught between two lands, with many casting votes in one country but residing in another. Only about a quarter million of the more than 3 million Turks in Germany hold German citizenship, according to 2016 numbers from the Federal Statistical Office of Germany. That may be set to change, as the current government has promised to end Germany’s ban on dual citizenship – and along with it, a difficult choice of loyalty forced upon generations of Turks in Germany.

For Turks in Germany, ‘home’ is a complicated concept - CSMonitor.com

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @3.1    8 months ago
Politically, Turks in Germany are so important back “home” that Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has campaigned in Germany, setting up offices to maintain a physical footprint. While campaigning in Germany a decade ago, Mr. Erdoğan advised this group to “integrate yourselves into German society but don’t assimilate.” Indeed,  surveys show  Turks abroad are remarkably connected to Turkey politically and culturally.

Yes, but that visit by Erdogan was 10 years ago.

Only about a quarter million of the more than 3 million Turks in Germany hold German citizenship, according to 2016 numbers from the Federal Statistical Office of Germany. That may be set to change, as the current government has promised to end Germany’s ban on dual citizenship – and along with it, a difficult choice of loyalty forced upon generations of Turks in Germany.

Yes, as I posted in my first comment the law changed on 1/1/2000 which contributed to an increase in Turks becoming citizens. If I remember correctly Germany has a foreign-born population of around 14 million. The largest minority is Turks.

It's a good thing that Germany does have immigration since their population is dwindling quickly.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1.2  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kavika @3.1.1    8 months ago
If I remember correctly Germany has a foreign-born population of around 14 million.

For a country of their size that is frightening.


It's a good thing that Germany does have immigration since their population is dwindling quickly.

A first world disaster.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1.3  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @3.1.2    8 months ago
For a country of their size that is frightening.

Why?

A first world disaster.

The only disaster is that Germany cannot replace is older generation. Having immigrants is what is keeping their head above water and even that isn't capable of having them at least break even in the population game.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1.4  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kavika @3.1.3    8 months ago

Do you remember the period called "the Dark Ages.?"

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1.5  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @3.1.4    8 months ago

I'm not that old, congratulations to you if you are.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1.6  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kavika @3.1.5    8 months ago

Then let me tell you what it was like. It is when a backward culture replaces a civilized one, to Kissinger's point.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Professor Quiet
3.2  Jack_TX  replied to  Kavika @3    8 months ago
Most of Western Europe faces the same problem.

Most of the developed world is facing some form of that problem.  Including us.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Professor Quiet
4  Jack_TX    8 months ago
We now live in a tribalistic, politically polarized national climate, a place where no one feels safe, the economy is collapsing, demographics are changing and emotions run high.

I feel quite safe. 

The economy is actually doing the opposite of collapsing, which is the problem.  That's what inflation is.

The only constant about American demographics is change. 

If your emotions are running high, that's your decision and your problem.  Get them under control.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
4.1  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Jack_TX @4    8 months ago
I feel quite safe. 

You are not alone. I have an in-law who feels the same way. He is emersed in his work and family and acts like it is 1960. He never watches the news and tells others to ignore it.

My advice to him is always the same: It isn't going away.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Professor Quiet
4.1.1  Jack_TX  replied to  Vic Eldred @4.1    8 months ago
He never watches the news and tells others to ignore it.

That's not why I feel safe.

My advice to him is always the same: It isn't going away.

Of course not.  Depending on which particular "problem" is in question, they've all been around in one form or another for at least a century.

Which begs the question... how are people still afraid of things that have been going on for decades or centuries?  

 
 

Who is online



35 visitors