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Scalise Withdraws as Speaker Candidate, Leaving G.O.P. in Chaos

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  hallux  •  8 months ago  •  74 comments

By:   Luke Broadwater, Catie Edmondson and Karoun Demirjian - NYT

Scalise Withdraws as Speaker Candidate, Leaving G.O.P. in Chaos
The No. 2 Republican had worked to win over holdouts but could not find a path to uniting his fractious party.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana withdrew on Thursday from consideration for the speakership he was on the cusp of claiming after hard-line Republicans balked at rallying around their party’s chosen candidate, leaving the House leaderless and the G.O.P. in chaos.

After being   narrowly nominated   for speaker during a Wednesday closed-door secret-ballot contest among House Republicans, Mr. Scalise, their No. 2 leader, found himself far from the 217 votes needed to be elected on the House floor. Many supporters of his challenger, Representative Jim Jordan of Ohio, the right-wing Republican endorsed by former President Donald J. Trump, refused to switch their allegiance.

With no clear end in sight to the G.O.P. infighting that has left one chamber of Congress paralyzed at a time of challenges at home and abroad, Mr. Scalise said he would step aside in hopes that someone else could unite the fractious party.



“I just shared with my colleagues that I was withdrawing my name as a candidate for speaker-designee,” Mr. Scalise said. “If you look at where our conference is, there’s still work to be done. Our conference still has to come together, and it’s not there. There are still some people that have their own agendas.”





His abrupt exit left Republicans back at square one, as fractured as ever over who should lead them and trading recriminations about the disarray in which they found themselves.




They planned a Friday morning meeting to discuss how to move forward.

“Steve won fair and square, and yet we had people who refused to vote for him,” said Representative Don Bacon of Nebraska, adding, “If you reward bad behavior, you’re going to get more of it.”

Mr. Scalise’s downfall came after an extraordinary few days on Capitol Hill that put Republican divisions on vivid display. Mr. Scalise surpassed Mr. Jordan during the internal party contest by just 14 votes. But rather than consolidating his narrow base of backers, Mr. Scalise almost immediately began hemorrhaging supporters, as lawmakers from several factions publicized that they did not intend to fall into line behind him.



Then Mr. Trump weighed in on Thursday against Mr. Scalise, arguing that the Louisianian was unfit for the speakership because   he has blood cancer .

“Steve is a man that is in serious trouble, from the standpoint of his cancer,” Mr. Trump said on Fox News Radio, adding, “I just don’t know how you can do the job when you have such a serious problem.”




Other top House Republicans refrained from publicly rallying around Mr. Scalise, allowing the resistance to fester. Mr. Jordan never made a full-throated endorsement of Mr. Scalise, despite indicating his support. And Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the ousted former speaker who has an icy relationship with Mr. Scalise, said the Louisiana Republican had overestimated his backing and might be unable to recover.




After Mr. Scalise’s withdrawal, Mr. Jordan’s supporters immediately began endorsing him as next in line, and he was expected to pursue the speakership on Friday. But he is likely to encounter opposition from the party’s more moderate members.

“I hope now he’s the obvious choice,” said Representative Jim Banks of Indiana, who backs Mr. Jordan. “He barely came in second place to Steve Scalise.”

But Representative Mike Garcia of California said the way Mr. Jordan’s supporters acted after he lost would make it hard for some in the conference to back the Ohioan.





“There’s an academic debate about whether we reward the tyranny of the minority in this case,” Mr. Garcia said, adding, “The problem is, I think there’s enough people that would see what has happened and transpired over the last 40 hours and not support him; that we’re going to have the same problem with Jordan that we had with Scalise.”




Mr. McCarthy did not rule out a return to the speakership as well, saying he would “let the conference decide” whether to reinstate him to the job from which he was   ousted just last week .

And Representative   Patrick T. McHenry   of North Carolina, who was named the   interim speaker   after Mr. McCarthy’s removal, was also being talked about as a potential candidate.

Foreseeing a fight that could last for weeks, some members were discussing how they might give Mr. McHenry, whose role is primarily to hold an election for a speaker, more power to carry out the chamber’s work until the conflict could be resolved.

Mr. Scalise’s exit was the latest remarkable turn in a saga that has been marked by whiplash, shifting alliances and petty grudges. The situation has highlighted major changes in the nature of the House Republican conference, whose members once dutifully lined up in support of their chosen leaders but increasingly appeared to be pursuing a strategy of every member for themselves.





The range of complaints against Mr. Scalise ran the gamut, crossing ideological and regional lines and reflecting the many competing factions among House Republicans. But some were merely petty and personal.




“There’s some folks that really need to look in the mirror over the next couple of days and decide: Are we going to get back on track, or are they going to try to pursue their own agenda?” Mr. Scalise said. “You can’t do both.”

Even though the votes on Thursday had clearly stacked up against Mr. Scalise, some of his allies were still surprised by his withdrawal announcement in a closed-door meeting. Several openly wept.

The uncertainty has hobbled the House, as it confronts multiple crises, with U.S. allies Israel and Ukraine at war and a government shutdown looming next month without a congressional spending agreement.

Representative Mark Alford of Missouri said the conference was in disarray: “There is some deep mistrust. There’s some communication problems. Some things are jacked up.”





But he believed that fellow Republicans would work out their differences. “We will get to 217,” he said of the votes needed. “Who that is, I don’t know.”


Mr. Scalise has served in House leadership since 2014, and overcame great personal hardship to become the choice of a majority of Republicans to lead the chamber.

He is undergoing intense treatment for his blood cancer, which has prompted him to wear a mask to vote on the House floor and at news conferences. And in 2017, during a practice for a congressional baseball game, an anti-Trump extremist   shot and seriously wounded Mr. Scalise . He still walks with a limp from the incident.

It was not clear whether Mr. Scalise could keep his post as majority leader after his failed attempt to win the top job, though Mr. McCarthy expressed confidence that he could. And Mr. Scalise indicated he would try.

“I’m the majority leader of the House. I love the job I have,” Mr. Scalise said. “I’ve had many challenges in my life. I’ve been tested in ways that really put perspective on life.”











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Hallux
PhD Principal
1  seeder  Hallux    8 months ago

And these characters think they can run the nation?

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Hallux @1    8 months ago

This infighting is gonna bury us all

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
1.1.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1    8 months ago

I hope not but all the signs point in that direction.

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
1.1.2  cjcold  replied to  Hallux @1.1.1    8 months ago

I'm actually enjoying fascists eating their own.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  cjcold @1.1.2    8 months ago
I'm actually enjoying fascists eating their own.

Who do you think are fascists?

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.1.4  devangelical  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.3    8 months ago

the people that can't grasp the obvious and then ask stupid questions in their comments...

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.5  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @1.1.4    8 months ago
the people that can't grasp the obvious and then ask stupid questions in their comments...

So you have no answers either.

That is what I suspected.

It is usually the case when people shout inanities about fascists.

Especially when they don't even have a passing understanding of the word.

As evidenced almost daily here, and invariably they are used by some small subset of folks who band together in their ignorance.

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
1.1.6  JBB  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.3    8 months ago

Whoever is triggered by the word fascist!

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.7  Texan1211  replied to  JBB @1.1.6    8 months ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
1.1.8  Michael C.  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.5    8 months ago
Especially when they don't even have a passing understanding of the word.

Do you think its like  like when some Republicans call any Democrat they don't like a "Socialist"?

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
2  TᵢG    8 months ago

I am aghast at how dysfunctional the contemporary GOP has become.   Look no further than Trump and his sycophants for the root cause.

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
2.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  TᵢG @2    8 months ago

Most people harbor a combination of liberal, conservative and libertarian ... the 'modern' GoP seem bent on destroying all three. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
2.1.1  TᵢG  replied to  Hallux @2.1    8 months ago

Frankly, I do not think the modern GOP has clue one about where it is going and what it is doing.   There is no strategy, there is no rational leadership.   It is a dysfunctional mess.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
2.1.2  devangelical  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.1    8 months ago

the traditional republican blood letting seems a bit early in the season for this next election, although it could easily be argued that the campaign been going on for the last 8+ years. republicans are demonstrating to the voters that they cannot legislate, compromise, or lead, let alone rule. unfortunately, it's american citizens and possibly the world that will suffer as the victims while republican party owners work out their differences.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
2.1.3  Ozzwald  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.1    8 months ago
There is no strategy, there is no rational leadership.

They have one goal, power at any cost.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
2.1.4  TᵢG  replied to  Ozzwald @2.1.3    8 months ago

Certainly, but the 'they' is not cohesive.   It is a dysfunctional mess.

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
2.1.5  cjcold  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.1    8 months ago

So hate of the other is not a viable strategy?

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
2.1.6  TᵢG  replied to  cjcold @2.1.5    8 months ago

What does it accomplish?

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
2.1.7  Michael C.  replied to  Ozzwald @2.1.3    8 months ago
They have one goal, power at any cost.

I wonder?

While that's probably true for some, if their main goal was really power, they would probably take more actions towards that end. 

I think for many of them its a question of "control issues"-- trying to control things to get what they think they want. (And if they can't win control against the other party-- they try and gain control over members of their own).

Between their member in the House and their probable candidate for president, I would predict that in the next election Republicans will lose both Houses of Congress as well as the presidency.

(And another factor-- the "Big Government Republicans" obsession with having the Federal gov;t having more control over citizens' lives {the Abortion issue} ) 

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
2.1.8  Michael C.  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.6    8 months ago
What does it accomplish?

It helps the Democrats-- by raising the question in voters' minds: "Do I really want this party running (or more exactly "attempting to run") this country?

Perhaps the Dems should send bouquets of flowers-- or perhaps  boxes of expensive chocolates to eash republican in the House-- with a nice card thanking them for their help in getting more Democrats elected in the next election! jrSmiley_24_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
3  Tacos!    8 months ago
There are still some people that have their own agendas.

Sure, but when people like McCarthy or Scalise (or Boehner and Ryan before them) give up on leadership, those “people” win. 

They put me in mind of Hamas, which was formed by people who objected to the fact that the PLO was negotiating with Israel. Like those extremists, our so-called “Freedom Caucus” nut bags would rather make the world burn than negotiate with anyone they disagree with or compromise on anything.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
4  Buzz of the Orient    8 months ago

If I were an American I damn well would never vote for a party that is a combination of not wanting to get it together and not able to get it together. I'd be curious to see what the polls are going to indicate - and by polls I mean by a REPUTABLE polling organization like Pew.  Polls are just too easy to manipulate and they damn well are manipulated.

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
4.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4    8 months ago

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
4.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @4.1    8 months ago

You got it.

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
4.2  Michael C.  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4    8 months ago
If I were an American I damn well would never vote for a party that is a combination of not wanting to get it together and not able to get it together.

That alone is a good reason. 

But as previously mentioned, IMO most people want less interference in their lives from Big Government (and not more which would happen if the Republicans' crazy Abortion views become law).

Perhaps the republicans should also change their position on the issue of guns. By making it harder to get a gun-- because the republicans keep shooting themselvwes in the foot! (to coin sa phrase).

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
4.2.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Michael C. @4.2    8 months ago

It may well have been one of the reasons for Hamas' timing that the American Congress is paralyzed.  How long do you think it will take for a Speaker to be installed?  Personally, I doubt it will be soon.  IMO I have felt that Liz Cheney should be POTUS but if not, she might garner the votes to be Speaker - and why not?  She has displayed the integrity and principles lacking in so many other lawmakers, has proven bipartisanship and would probably gain enough support from both sides to win, unless MOST of the lawmakers are complete assholes - However, I guess I fear that could be the case. 

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.2.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.2.1    8 months ago

I think that the principle timing was an opportunistic one, a response to Israeli and Palestinian political dysfunction and ongoing Saudi-Israeli peace talks,

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
4.2.3  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @4.2.2    8 months ago

Yep, a conglomerate of reasons, and I'll add to them the current discontent in Israel over Netanyahu's attempt to shield himself from imprisonment by limiting the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, wherein many soldiers demonstrated in the streets rather than be readily available, and others were needed to control the protests.   It was "A Perfect Storm".

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
4.2.4  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.2.3    8 months ago

Completely agree.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5  Kavika     8 months ago

And the circus continues.

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
5.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Kavika @5    8 months ago

512

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6  Vic Eldred    8 months ago

I'm guessing it will be Jordan.

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
6.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @6    8 months ago

He's a good choice for getting nothing done other than really bad kabuki.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6.1.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  Hallux @6.1    8 months ago

Who is better?

McCarthy or Jordan?

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.1.2  evilone  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.1    8 months ago
Who is better? McCarthy or Jordan?

Dave Joyce.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6.1.3  Vic Eldred  replied to  evilone @6.1.2    8 months ago
Dave Joyce.

He is not running.

Same question.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.1.4  evilone  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.3    8 months ago
He is not running.

As of this morning no one's officially running except the Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.5  TᵢG  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.1    8 months ago
Who is better?McCarthy or Jordan?

Trump endorsed both and both kowtow to Trump so they are equivalent in my view.   Neither should be speaker.

McCarthy cannot hold the speakership so that is a functional problem.   Maybe Jordan can.   That gives him a functional edge if he can actually win (which is doubtful given the dysfunctional GOP).

It is sickening to see the GOP continue to kowtow to Trump.   The party has lost its collective mind.

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
6.1.6  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.1    8 months ago
Who is better?McCarthy or Jordan?

Liz Cheney, but the party messed up big time by surrendering to sycophancy. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
6.1.7  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @6.1.6    8 months ago

I'd vote for her to be Canada's PM.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.8  TᵢG  replied to  Hallux @6.1.6    8 months ago

Excellent!

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
6.1.9  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @6.1.7    8 months ago

From the grave!

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
6.1.10  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @6.1.9    8 months ago

That's kind of an odd reply, a strange way to indicate that that would never happen in one's lifetime.  For whom are you predicting death - me or her?

 
 
 
Hallux
PhD Principal
6.1.11  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @6.1.10    8 months ago

Just needling our cousins to the south. Live long and prosper Buzz.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
6.1.12  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @6.1.11    8 months ago

Oh, okay.

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
6.1.13  cjcold  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.1    8 months ago

Jordan sold his soul years ago.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6.1.14  Vic Eldred  replied to  TᵢG @6.1.5    8 months ago
Neither should be speaker.

Is there anyone in the majority party who should be Speaker?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6.1.15  Vic Eldred  replied to  cjcold @6.1.13    8 months ago

There is a reason only one could answer my question.

TiG said neither because he knew exactly where I was going.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.16  TᵢG  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.14    8 months ago

Yes.   How about Asa Hutchinson?   He is not going to get the nomination and is a solid individual with tons of executive / political experience and is largely moderate.   A good, solid individual.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.17  TᵢG  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.15    8 months ago
TiG said neither because he knew exactly where I was going.

I said neither because that is my position.   A position I explained @6.1.5

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.18  TᵢG  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.14    8 months ago

No comment on my answer @6.1.16?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6.1.19  Vic Eldred  replied to  TᵢG @6.1.16    8 months ago
 How about Asa Hutchinson? 

How did we get there?  Hutchinson is no longer in the House of Representatives.

I asked if there was anyone in the majority party who should be Speaker?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
6.1.20  Vic Eldred  replied to  TᵢG @6.1.18    8 months ago

It wasn't an answer to my question.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.21  TᵢG  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.19    8 months ago
How did we get there?  Hutchinson is no longer in the House of Representatives.

The Speaker does not need to be a current member of the House (or even in Congress).

I asked if there was anyone in the majority party who should be Speaker?

What party do you think is the majority party?    Answer:  Republican

What party is Asa Hutchinson a member of?   Answer:  Republican

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
6.1.22  TᵢG  replied to  Vic Eldred @6.1.20    8 months ago
It wasn't an answer to my question.

It was a direct, thoughtful answer to your question.    You asked @6.1.14:

Vic @6.1.14 - Is there anyone in the majority party who should be Speaker?

Yeah, Vic, Asa Hutchinson is a member of the majority party (Republican) and I think he would make a great speaker of the House.   


So why did you ask your question @6.1.14?

If you want to limit the answer to only existing GOP representatives in the House, then I would look for those who:

  • Did not and do not cater to Trump
  • Have a demonstrated ability to work in a bipartisan fashion
  • Have substantial political leadership experience

I think the GOP has a major problem on its hands given they are being controlled by a small group of extremists.   Without working in some way with the Ds, I am not sure how the House will get back on track.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
6.2  Ozzwald  replied to  Vic Eldred @6    8 months ago
I'm guessing it will be Jordan.

Jordan has failed at all his current committees.  Why would anyone want a failure as speaker?  Besides Jordan has already demonstrated his contempt of Congress.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.2.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Ozzwald @6.2    8 months ago
Why would anyone want a failure as speaker?

He is virulently "anti woke", and that is more than enough for some. 

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
6.2.2  afrayedknot  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2.1    8 months ago

…"anti woke"…

Whenever you see ‘woke’ invoked, it is a sure bet that whoever utters it is so out of touch with the realities of today they are ill-equipped to move forward in their illogical pursuit of the past.

And who was the beneficiary of past policy? Just another example of bumper-sticker sloganeering in lieu of any desire to address the issues. Weak. 

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.2.3  evilone  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2.1    8 months ago
He is virulently "anti woke",

He's a moron.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
6.2.4  Ozzwald  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2.1    8 months ago
He is virulently "anti woke"

By "anti woke" I assume you mean "ignorant", which I believe is one of the accepted definitions.  And I agree, he is.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.3  evilone  replied to  Vic Eldred @6    8 months ago
I'm guessing it will be Jordan.

Jordan is a failure and disgrace to the office. Anyone backing him should be ashamed of themselves.

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
6.4  Michael C.  replied to  Vic Eldred @6    8 months ago
I'm guessing it will be Jordan.

Maybe not-- I think there are too many of them who can't decide if they want to "cross the Jordan"

(to coin yet another phrase)

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
7  JohnRussell    8 months ago

Jim Jordan was a collaborator in the events of jan 6th. He had multiple phone calls with Trump on that day and the days just preceding, and when he was subpoenaed to testify what those calls were about he failed to show up. 

At the least he is guilty of being supportive of the traitor and is to this day. 

It would be a disgrace to make him Speaker Of The House. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
7.1  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @7    8 months ago
"Jim Jordan was a collaborator in the events of jan 6th. He had multiple phone calls with Trump on that day and the days just preceding, and when he was subpoenaed to testify what those calls were about he failed to show up." 

Can you verify any of this or are you making stuff up?

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
7.1.1  cjcold  replied to  Greg Jones @7.1    8 months ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
7.1.2  Michael C.  replied to  Greg Jones @7.1    8 months ago
Can you verify any of this or are you making stuff up?

Don't answer him John-- its a trap!!!

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
7.1.3  JohnRussell  replied to  Michael C. @7.1.2    8 months ago

The day he can "trap" me I will quit posting on internet forums. 

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
7.2  Michael C.  replied to  JohnRussell @7    8 months ago
Jim Jordan was a collaborator in the events of jan 6th. He had multiple phone calls with Trump on that day and the days just preceding, and when he was subpoenaed to testify what those calls were about he failed to show up.  At the least he is guilty of being supportive of the traitor and is to this day. 

Well, that's yet another reason why more republicans might vote for him!

 
 
 
Right Down the Center
Senior Guide
8  Right Down the Center    8 months ago

Every time it looks like the GOP can make gains they go and do something really stupid to try and give it back to the Dems.  It  looks like they learned nothing from trying to take a far right stance on abortion rights in the states when all they had to do was go for a common sense 15 or 20 week ban that the majority of Americans could have lived with. 

Now they get rid of McCarthy with no plan and just show how ineffective they are. Make no mistake, independents are watching.  They are watching the infighting and they are watching as a far right winger like Gates has them by the balls.

If they were smart they would bring McCarthy back even if it takes a deal with the Dems and shove Gates and his half dozen followers in a corner and tell them to shut up.  

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
8.1  Michael C.  replied to  Right Down the Center @8    8 months ago

If they were smart

That's one big "if" !!!

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
8.2  Michael C.  replied to  Right Down the Center @8    8 months ago
It  looks like they learned nothing from trying to take a far right stance on abortion rights in the states when all they had to do was go for a common sense 15 or 20 week ban that the majority of Americans could have lived with. 

I totally agree. And that's one of a few foolish (and self-defeating) things they've done.

But I was thinking about their stances on Abortion for some time-- and while Big Government Republicans differ amongst themselves re: the amount of Government interference in peoples' lives they want.... IMO this issue alone might sink the Republicans' chances in the next election!

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
9  Kavika     8 months ago

He certainly is ''anti woke'' he's been in a coma for decades.

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
10  Michael C.    8 months ago

The GOP in chaos?

I am absolutely shocked...shocked I tell you!!!  

 
 
 
Michael C.
Freshman Expert
10.1  Michael C.  replied to  Michael C. @10    8 months ago

I am absolutely shocked...shocked I tell you!!!  

(Usually when I type that, I post the relevant link from Casablanca but I figure that by now everyone's so familiar with that scene there's really no need to.)

 
 

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